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heavy and sluggish
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Oleg Smirnov
2015-02-06 03:17:23 UTC
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<http://russia-insider.com/en/military/2014/11/04/02-05-14pm/latest_russian_fighter_jet_blows_americas_away>

The Latest Russian Fighter Jet Blows America's Away
Outgunned by the Su-30 family of aircraft and suffering critical design flaws,
the American F-35 is staring down the barrel of obsolescence – and punching a
gaping hole in western air defences.
This article <http://is.gd/OCUMiS> is an excellent read to understand how
Russia's technological level is best in its class in many military sectors,
especially with regard to fighter jets. It originally appeared in Russia &
India Report. The SU-30 continues to be the number one choice among global
buyers. ..

Winslow T. Wheeler, Director of the US’ Straus Military Reform Project, Centre
for Defense information, agrees. “The F-35 is too heavy and sluggish to be
successful as a fighter,” he says. “If we ever face an enemy with a serious
air force we will be in deep trouble.”
So far the US has been lucky it has never really encountered a “serious”
military. Over the skies of war-weary Iraq, tiny Libya and utterly defenseless
Afghanistan, the American aircraft operated with impunity. But luck can run
out – if they ever come up against the air forces of Russia, China or India
the outcome won’t be so one-sided. In particular, the Indian Air Force has
beaten the USAF’s fourth generation fighters using both third and fourth
generation jets.
Dudley Henriques
2015-02-06 12:14:06 UTC
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Post by Oleg Smirnov
<http://russia-insider.com/en/military/2014/11/04/02-05-14pm/latest_russian_fighter_jet_blows_americas_away>
The Latest Russian Fighter Jet Blows America's Away
Outgunned by the Su-30 family of aircraft and suffering critical design flaws,
the American F-35 is staring down the barrel of obsolescence - and punching a
gaping hole in western air defences.
This article <http://is.gd/OCUMiS> is an excellent read to understand how
Russia's technological level is best in its class in many military sectors,
especially with regard to fighter jets. It originally appeared in Russia &
India Report. The SU-30 continues to be the number one choice among global
buyers. ..
Winslow T. Wheeler, Director of the US' Straus Military Reform Project, Centre
for Defense information, agrees. "The F-35 is too heavy and sluggish to be
successful as a fighter," he says. "If we ever face an enemy with a serious
air force we will be in deep trouble."
So far the US has been lucky it has never really encountered a "serious"
military. Over the skies of war-weary Iraq, tiny Libya and utterly defenseless
Afghanistan, the American aircraft operated with impunity. But luck can run
out - if they ever come up against the air forces of Russia, China or India
the outcome won't be so one-sided. In particular, the Indian Air Force has
beaten the USAF's fourth generation fighters using both third and fourth
generation jets.
There is no doubt that the Sukhoi Design Bureau has put out a very impressive airplane with the -30.
Dudley Henriques
Peter Stickney
2015-02-07 03:45:52 UTC
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Post by Dudley Henriques
Post by Oleg Smirnov
<http://russia-insider.com/en/military/2014/11/04/02-05-14pm/latest_russian_fighter_jet_blows_americas_away>
The Latest Russian Fighter Jet Blows America's Away
Outgunned by the Su-30 family of aircraft and suffering critical design
flaws, the American F-35 is staring down the barrel of obsolescence - and
punching a gaping hole in western air defences.
This article <http://is.gd/OCUMiS> is an excellent read to understand how
Russia's technological level is best in its class in many military sectors,
especially with regard to fighter jets. It originally appeared in Russia
& India Report. The SU-30 continues to be the number one choice among
global buyers. ..
Winslow T. Wheeler, Director of the US' Straus Military Reform Project,
Centre for Defense information, agrees. "The F-35 is too heavy and
sluggish to be successful as a fighter," he says. "If we ever face an
enemy with a serious air force we will be in deep trouble."
"It's heavy and sluggish, like a sponge." - ted Stryker, Flight 209,
_Airplane_.
Post by Dudley Henriques
Post by Oleg Smirnov
So far the US has been lucky it has never really encountered a "serious"
military. Over the skies of war-weary Iraq, tiny Libya and utterly
defenseless Afghanistan, the American aircraft operated with impunity.
But luck can run out - if they ever come up against the air forces of
Russia, China or India the outcome won't be so one-sided. In particular,
the Indian Air Force has beaten the USAF's fourth generation fighters
using both third and fourth generation jets.
Annnd the Russians have encountered a "serious" military _where_, exactly?
Afghanistan, 20th Century Round 2? (Brits fighting the tribesmen was Round
1)
The last time Russians in any number engaged in a serious air war was Korea,
in 1951. They didn't do as well as they claimed.
There were also Russians who were involved in the 1971 War of Attrition
between Egypt and Israel, It didn't work out so well for them, either.
(Losing a MiG-21 to a pair of Fouga Magisters... tsk! tsk!)

We've talked the American/Indian engagements to death. We all know how the
Rules of Engagement were adgered so that they could be any WVR guns-only
combat at all.
Post by Dudley Henriques
There is no doubt that the Sukhoi Design Bureau has put out a very
impressive airplane with the -30. Dudley Henriques
Don't get me wrong - the Rusians have built some very good stuff. But to
pretend that they somehow have an edge in experiencing modern air warfare,
other than, as used by their clients, allowing McDonnell Douglas to
advertise itself as "The World's Largest Distributer of MiG parts" is, shall
we say, amusing.
--
Pete Stickney
Always remember to close all parentheses.
We're not paying to air-condition the entire paragraph.
jack595
2015-02-06 20:15:14 UTC
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Post by Oleg Smirnov
<http://russia-insider.com/en/military/2014/11/04/02-05-14pm/latest_russian_fighter_jet_blows_americas_away>
The Latest Russian Fighter Jet Blows America's Away
Outgunned by the Su-30 family of aircraft and suffering critical design flaws,
the American F-35 is staring down the barrel of obsolescence – and punching a
gaping hole in western air defences.
This article <http://is.gd/OCUMiS> is an excellent read to understand how
Russia's technological level is best in its class in many military sectors,
especially with regard to fighter jets. It originally appeared in Russia &
India Report. The SU-30 continues to be the number one choice among global
buyers. ..
Winslow T. Wheeler, Director of the US’ Straus Military Reform Project, Centre
for Defense information, agrees. “The F-35 is too heavy and sluggish to be
successful as a fighter,” he says. “If we ever face an enemy with a serious
air force we will be in deep trouble.”
So far the US has been lucky it has never really encountered a “serious”
military. Over the skies of war-weary Iraq, tiny Libya and utterly defenseless
Afghanistan, the American aircraft operated with impunity. But luck can run
out – if they ever come up against the air forces of Russia, China or India
the outcome won’t be so one-sided. In particular, the Indian Air Force has
beaten the USAF’s fourth generation fighters using both third and fourth
generation jets.
Before you get jollies and....


Well, before you get piled upon... its really the other way around. The Su-30
and 35 don't hold much chance against an F-35. It has inferior sensors, stealth,
comms, ECM and likely transonic performance (where the flight regime most A2A
actually occurs.) The Sukhoi has significantly poorer air to ground... the
weapons it could carry are markedly inferior to western systems like the JDAM,
JSOW, AGM-130 ect.

The Russians are actually significantly behind the United States in fighter
technology... simply by virtue of an economic collapse and the paucity of
funding given to aircraft development. By comparison the US has developed and in
the process of fielding not one, but two 5th Gen fighters, as well as a series
of new generation stealthy UCAVs (X-47B).
w***@gmail.com
2015-02-06 23:47:52 UTC
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The real problem is experience and currency. When I could fly ACM 3 times a week I didn't have to think about maneuvering I just reacted to the situation as it developed. Anybody just flying enough to maintain "currency" as cited in regulations was easy meat. Once a week is okay for that but not for competition. Once a month isn't enough for a clear day hop around the pattern.
So,Ivan, how many sorties do y'all get a month?
Daryl
2015-02-07 02:56:30 UTC
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Post by w***@gmail.com
The real problem is experience and currency. When I could fly ACM 3 times a week I didn't have to think about maneuvering I just reacted to the situation as it developed. Anybody just flying enough to maintain "currency" as cited in regulations was easy meat. Once a week is okay for that but not for competition. Once a month isn't enough for a clear day hop around the pattern.
So,Ivan, how many sorties do y'all get a month?
What we get to see is their best. We never get to see their worst.
Meanwhile, we get to see out own across the board. It's like peewee
football. Some only let you see the really good ones play while the
others sit on the bench and others play all players. In the end, the
team that plays everyone (if it sticks together) ends up a better team
with a better win record when the other team is forced to play everyone.

In the case of which is better, the football has missiles, cannons and
soon to be lazers.
--
Visit http://droopyvids.com for free TV and Movies. One of
the Largest Collections of Public Domain and Classic TV on
the Internet.
Daryl
2015-02-06 23:48:06 UTC
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Ike
2015-02-07 04:41:18 UTC
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A weapons system is comprised of aircraft, offensive/defensive detection
means, guns and missiles, guidance/aiming means, defensive
devices/technologies, pilot training/skill, evolved tactics, and the
infrastructure (systems, people) that keep the aircraft flying and
combat-effective. And we must add to the equation the attitude and
confidence of the pilot, whether in the cockpit or staring at a UAV
control console. It's like a chain - excellence in many of these areas
becomes meaningless if there is one weak link.

As a Marine Corps pilot I'm totally obsolete, but feel confident that
our F/A-18, F-117 (should be A), and F-35 weapon system packages would
stand up against anything from Russia, Sweden, China, or France.

Ike
w***@gmail.com
2015-02-07 04:58:22 UTC
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The stealth designs look promising but the Sukhois from 27 on are flying radar reflectors. Think about that. F4Es could pick up each other at 60+ miles; the SUs are twice as big. As for the Russian IRST, check out the "FA" site to see an expert's appreciation of the MiG 29's kit/. I was surprised at his comments since I was experienced in the Deuce's IRSTS and found it a valuable asset.
Paul F Austin
2015-02-09 01:34:28 UTC
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Oleg Smirnov
2015-03-04 16:32:56 UTC
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<http://kret.com/en/news/3668/>

The new generation of corvettes are in the St. Petersburg shipyard

27 Feb 2015

Electronic warfare systems and stealth technology will make the ship
"invisible" to the enemy

The new generation of corvette, part of Project 20386 for Russian Navy, will
be finished in either late 2015 or early 2016 in St. Petersburg, according to
TASS, citing a source in the defense industry. Modern electronic warfare
systems and stealth technology will make the corvette invisible to the enemy.

The design of the new corvette will combine basic configuration elements and
removable combat units that will significantly expand the range of tasks it
can perform.

The corvette will include an onboard helicopter; the possibility of equipping
it with drones is also being explored. In addition, the ship will have the
latest domestic avionics and electronic weapons systems, which have no
equivalents in the world.

It is expected that this will increase by many times the effectiveness of
monitoring water surface, air and underwater conditions and will facilitate
new possibilities for conducting electronic warfare, despite the fact that the
corvette will be manufactured using stealth technology that makes it invisible
to the enemy.

A number of new systems, including avionics and electronic weapons, will be
installed on the two corvettes Retivyi and Strogii (Project 20380), which were
moved to St. Petersburg's Northern Shipyard on February 20, 2015.

Today, such electronic warfare systems are installed on all Russian surface
ships. They have proven to be effective and practical more than once.

Russia's leading organization for developing electronic warfare systems for
the Navy's surface ships is Taganrog Research Institute of Telecommunications,
which is part of KRET.

Equipment developed by the KRET enterprise can be found on all the large
surface ships of the Russian Navy, including the Moskva missile cruiser
(Project 1164), Peter the Great heavy nuclear missile cruiser (Project 1144),
and the Admiral Kuznetsov heavy aircraft carrier (Project 11435).
Post by Oleg Smirnov
<http://russia-insider.com/en/military/2014/11/04/02-05-14pm/latest_russian_fighter_jet_blows_americas_away>
The Latest Russian Fighter Jet Blows America's Away
jack595
2015-03-04 17:30:44 UTC
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Post by Oleg Smirnov
<http://kret.com/en/news/3668/>
The new generation of corvettes are in the St. Petersburg shipyard
27 Feb 2015
Electronic warfare systems and stealth technology will make the ship
"invisible" to the enemy
The new generation of corvette, part of Project 20386 for Russian Navy, will
be finished in either late 2015 or early 2016 in St. Petersburg, according to
TASS, citing a source in the defense industry. Modern electronic warfare
systems and stealth technology will make the corvette invisible to the enemy.
The design of the new corvette will combine basic configuration elements and
removable combat units that will significantly expand the range of tasks it
can perform.
The corvette will include an onboard helicopter; the possibility of equipping
it with drones is also being explored. In addition, the ship will have the
latest domestic avionics and electronic weapons systems, which have no
equivalents in the world.
It is expected that this will increase by many times the effectiveness of
monitoring water surface, air and underwater conditions and will facilitate
new possibilities for conducting electronic warfare, despite the fact that the
corvette will be manufactured using stealth technology that makes it invisible
to the enemy.
A number of new systems, including avionics and electronic weapons, will be
installed on the two corvettes Retivyi and Strogii (Project 20380), which were
moved to St. Petersburg's Northern Shipyard on February 20, 2015.
Today, such electronic warfare systems are installed on all Russian surface
ships. They have proven to be effective and practical more than once.
Russia's leading organization for developing electronic warfare systems for
the Navy's surface ships is Taganrog Research Institute of Telecommunications,
which is part of KRET.
Equipment developed by the KRET enterprise can be found on all the large
surface ships of the Russian Navy, including the Moskva missile cruiser
(Project 1164), Peter the Great heavy nuclear missile cruiser (Project 1144),
and the Admiral Kuznetsov heavy aircraft carrier (Project 11435).
Post by Oleg Smirnov
<http://russia-insider.com/en/military/2014/11/04/02-05-14pm/latest_russian_fighter_jet_blows_americas_away>
The Latest Russian Fighter Jet Blows America's Away
Are these the buckets you talked about? Doesn't look like 2015 or even 2016,
especially given the fine Russian workmanship and their on-time delivery of
materials.

http://7fbtk.blogspot.com/2014/10/xlt-project-20386-corvette-and-uavs.html
jonathan
2015-03-04 23:43:53 UTC
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Post by jack595
Post by Oleg Smirnov
<http://kret.com/en/news/3668/>
The new generation of corvettes are in the St. Petersburg shipyard
27 Feb 2015
Electronic warfare systems and stealth technology will make the ship
"invisible" to the enemy
The new generation of corvette, part of Project 20386 for Russian Navy, will
be finished in either late 2015 or early 2016 in St. Petersburg, according to
TASS, citing a source in the defense industry. Modern electronic warfare
systems and stealth technology will make the corvette invisible to the enemy.
The design of the new corvette will combine basic configuration elements and
removable combat units that will significantly expand the range of tasks it
can perform.
The corvette will include an onboard helicopter; the possibility of equipping
it with drones is also being explored. In addition, the ship will have the
latest domestic avionics and electronic weapons systems, which have no
equivalents in the world.
It is expected that this will increase by many times the effectiveness of
monitoring water surface, air and underwater conditions and will facilitate
new possibilities for conducting electronic warfare, despite the fact that the
corvette will be manufactured using stealth technology that makes it invisible
to the enemy.
A number of new systems, including avionics and electronic weapons, will be
installed on the two corvettes Retivyi and Strogii (Project 20380), which were
moved to St. Petersburg's Northern Shipyard on February 20, 2015.
Today, such electronic warfare systems are installed on all Russian surface
ships. They have proven to be effective and practical more than once.
Russia's leading organization for developing electronic warfare systems for
the Navy's surface ships is Taganrog Research Institute of Telecommunications,
which is part of KRET.
Equipment developed by the KRET enterprise can be found on all the large
surface ships of the Russian Navy, including the Moskva missile cruiser
(Project 1164), Peter the Great heavy nuclear missile cruiser (Project 1144),
and the Admiral Kuznetsov heavy aircraft carrier (Project 11435).
Post by Oleg Smirnov
<http://russia-insider.com/en/military/2014/11/04/02-05-14pm/latest_russian_fighter_jet_blows_americas_away>
The Latest Russian Fighter Jet Blows America's Away
Are these the buckets you talked about? Doesn't look like 2015 or even 2016,
especially given the fine Russian workmanship and their on-time delivery of
materials.
http://7fbtk.blogspot.com/2014/10/xlt-project-20386-corvette-and-uavs.html
According to Wiki they're really frigates, and although Russia
claims they intend to build 30, between 2007 and 2018 they're
projected to have a total of 8, roughly one a year. And they're
still decommissioning the old ships faster then they're
building new ones, and the new ships are much smaller.

So the Russian navy will continue getting smaller in number
and size for a decade or more. Provided they can maintain
current military spending, which is highly doubtful.

While the US is building roughly 2 Arleigh Burkes, 4 LCS's
and two nuclear subs a year.

And you're right about Russian military procurement problems, I
bet it's a nightmare. The old Soviet military contractors are
still in business, but operating at a fraction of capacity
so the inefficiency is overwhelming. Not to mention still
mired in Soviet era technology and a massive brain drain
where all the best and brightest have been fleeing Russia
in droves.

For instance, China has more of the latest Russian
tanks and jets than Russia does. Russia can't afford
many of them, or even afford to decommission their
old subs.




s
Paul F Austin
2015-03-05 00:44:47 UTC
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Post by jonathan
Post by jack595
Post by Oleg Smirnov
<http://kret.com/en/news/3668/>
The new generation of corvettes are in the St. Petersburg shipyard
27 Feb 2015
Electronic warfare systems and stealth technology will make the ship
"invisible" to the enemy
The new generation of corvette, part of Project 20386 for Russian Navy, will
be finished in either late 2015 or early 2016 in St. Petersburg, according to
TASS, citing a source in the defense industry. Modern electronic warfare
systems and stealth technology will make the corvette invisible to the enemy.
The design of the new corvette will combine basic configuration elements and
removable combat units that will significantly expand the range of tasks it
can perform.
The corvette will include an onboard helicopter; the possibility of equipping
it with drones is also being explored. In addition, the ship will have the
latest domestic avionics and electronic weapons systems, which have no
equivalents in the world.
It is expected that this will increase by many times the
effectiveness of
monitoring water surface, air and underwater conditions and will facilitate
new possibilities for conducting electronic warfare, despite the fact that the
corvette will be manufactured using stealth technology that makes it invisible
to the enemy.
A number of new systems, including avionics and electronic weapons, will be
installed on the two corvettes Retivyi and Strogii (Project 20380), which were
moved to St. Petersburg's Northern Shipyard on February 20, 2015.
Today, such electronic warfare systems are installed on all Russian surface
ships. They have proven to be effective and practical more than once.
Russia's leading organization for developing electronic warfare systems for
the Navy's surface ships is Taganrog Research Institute of
Telecommunications,
which is part of KRET.
Equipment developed by the KRET enterprise can be found on all the large
surface ships of the Russian Navy, including the Moskva missile cruiser
(Project 1164), Peter the Great heavy nuclear missile cruiser (Project 1144),
and the Admiral Kuznetsov heavy aircraft carrier (Project 11435).
Post by Oleg Smirnov
<http://russia-insider.com/en/military/2014/11/04/02-05-14pm/latest_russian_fighter_jet_blows_americas_away>
The Latest Russian Fighter Jet Blows America's Away
Are these the buckets you talked about? Doesn't look like 2015 or even 2016,
especially given the fine Russian workmanship and their on-time delivery of
materials.
http://7fbtk.blogspot.com/2014/10/xlt-project-20386-corvette-and-uavs.html
According to Wiki they're really frigates, and although Russia
claims they intend to build 30, between 2007 and 2018 they're
projected to have a total of 8, roughly one a year. And they're
still decommissioning the old ships faster then they're
building new ones, and the new ships are much smaller.
So the Russian navy will continue getting smaller in number
and size for a decade or more. Provided they can maintain
current military spending, which is highly doubtful.
While the US is building roughly 2 Arleigh Burkes, 4 LCS's
and two nuclear subs a year.
And you're right about Russian military procurement problems, I
bet it's a nightmare. The old Soviet military contractors are
still in business, but operating at a fraction of capacity
so the inefficiency is overwhelming. Not to mention still
mired in Soviet era technology and a massive brain drain
where all the best and brightest have been fleeing Russia
in droves.
For instance, China has more of the latest Russian
tanks and jets than Russia does. Russia can't afford
many of them, or even afford to decommission their
old subs.
On the other hand, I've seen bits and pieces about China and Russia
inserting Western commercial integrated circuits developed for e.g.,
cell phone use allows implementation of DRFM that generate
countermeasure techniques that the West can't match or overcome. There's
been a "holiday" in electronic countermeasures since, well, 9/11

Paul
jack595
2015-03-04 23:53:53 UTC
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Post by jack595
Post by Oleg Smirnov
<http://kret.com/en/news/3668/>
The new generation of corvettes are in the St. Petersburg shipyard
27 Feb 2015
Electronic warfare systems and stealth technology will make the ship
"invisible" to the enemy
The new generation of corvette, part of Project 20386 for Russian Navy, will
be finished in either late 2015 or early 2016 in St. Petersburg, according to
TASS, citing a source in the defense industry. Modern electronic warfare
systems and stealth technology will make the corvette invisible to the enemy.
The design of the new corvette will combine basic configuration elements and
removable combat units that will significantly expand the range of tasks it
can perform.
The corvette will include an onboard helicopter; the possibility of equipping
it with drones is also being explored. In addition, the ship will have the
latest domestic avionics and electronic weapons systems, which have no
equivalents in the world.
It is expected that this will increase by many times the effectiveness of
monitoring water surface, air and underwater conditions and will facilitate
new possibilities for conducting electronic warfare, despite the fact that the
corvette will be manufactured using stealth technology that makes it invisible
to the enemy.
A number of new systems, including avionics and electronic weapons, will be
installed on the two corvettes Retivyi and Strogii (Project 20380), which were
moved to St. Petersburg's Northern Shipyard on February 20, 2015.
Today, such electronic warfare systems are installed on all Russian surface
ships. They have proven to be effective and practical more than once.
Russia's leading organization for developing electronic warfare systems for
the Navy's surface ships is Taganrog Research Institute of Telecommunications,
which is part of KRET.
Equipment developed by the KRET enterprise can be found on all the large
surface ships of the Russian Navy, including the Moskva missile cruiser
(Project 1164), Peter the Great heavy nuclear missile cruiser (Project 1144),
and the Admiral Kuznetsov heavy aircraft carrier (Project 11435).
Post by Oleg Smirnov
<http://russia-insider.com/en/military/2014/11/04/02-05-14pm/latest_russian_fighter_jet_blows_americas_away>
The Latest Russian Fighter Jet Blows America's Away
Are these the buckets you talked about? Doesn't look like 2015 or even 2016,
especially given the fine Russian workmanship and their on-time delivery of
materials.
http://7fbtk.blogspot.com/2014/10/xlt-project-20386-corvette-and-uavs.html
Another thing to remember, those workers work to the norm, that is, they do a
fixed amount of work each day and usually finish that by lunch. Roughly half to
a third of what a Western worker would do.
Oleg Smirnov
2015-03-06 19:32:16 UTC
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<http://sputniknews.com/military/20150304/1019042643.html>

Russian Military Unveils Revolutionary Electronic Warfare System

MILITARY & INTELLIGENCE 15:31 04.03.2015 (updated 15:37 04.03.2015)

Russia's new Richag-AV radar and sonar jamming system can be mounted on
helicopters, ships and other military equipment to jam potential adversaries'
weapons systems from distances of several hundred kilometers away; it has been
hailed by developers as having no analogue anywhere in the world.

At a presentation for journalists in Kazan on Wednesday, Russian
radio-electronics firm Radio-Electronic Technologies Concern (KRET) announced
that it is handing over the first batch of a new helicopter-mounted electronic
warfare system known as the 'Richag-AV' to the armed forces.

The Richag-AV system, mounted on the Mi-8MTPR1 (a variant of the Mi-8MTB5-1
helicopter) is said to have no global equivalent. Its electronic
countermeasures system is designed to jam radar, sonar and other detection
systems in the aims of defending aircraft, helicopters, drones, ground and
naval forces against air-to-air and surface-to-air defense systems within a
radius of several hundred kilometers. It can be mounted on units from any
branch of the armed forces, including helicopters and airplanes, as well as
ground and ship-based forces.

The Mi8-MTPR1-based Richag-AV platform, using multi-beam antenna arrays with
DRFM technology, is designed to actively jam and thus 'blind' radar systems in
order to defend against radio-electronic guided weapons systems. In a combat
situation, the system would operate as part of an aviation shock attack group
aimed at breaking through virtually any defense system, blinding everything up
to and including the US MIM-104 'Patriot' anti-aircraft missile system.

Rossiyskaya Gazeta explained that in addition to working as a signal jamming
system, Richag-AV is capable of carrying out radar-based intelligence
gathering, which involves the finding of foreign sources of electromagnetic
radiation. With an onboard database on different types of military
installations, the system is capable of quickly determining the type of
target, thus allowing it to jam it effectively.

Reporters in Kazan were informed that the Russian armed forces received three
Mi-8MTPR-1 helicopters equipped with the Richag-Av on Wednesday, and will
receive a total of 18 such systems by October 2016, at a total cost of 11.5
billion rubles ($186 million).

The system's predecessor, the 'Smalta' jamming system, was developed back in
the 1970s, and featured a 100 km radius; in its own time the system was
considered among the most effective in the world. Alongside the Richag-AV, the
Russian military is presently being equipped with other electronic warfare
systems, including the L-175B Hibini air and 1L269 Krasuha-2 and 1L267
Moskva-1 ground-based electronic warfare systems.

KRET is Russia's largest radio-electronic industrial holding; it was created
in 2009. The company is involved in the development and production of
radio-electronic equipment in the civil and military aviation sphere, as well
as air-based radar systems, electronic warfare systems, and a variety of
precision instrumentation.
Oleg Smirnov
2015-03-13 06:46:30 UTC
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<http://sputniknews.com/military/20150313/1019429096.html>

More Money, More Problems: F-35 Software Overwhelmed With False Alarms

MILITARY & INTELLIGENCE 03:24 13.03.2015 (updated 08:53 13.03.2015)

New problems - namely, false alarms from overly sensitive threat-detecting
sensors - have arisen with the beleaguered F-35 aircraft, so far the most
expensive, and problem-ridden, piece of military equipment in US history.
The sensors on the fighter that are supposed to detect threats - like incoming
missiles - often don't know what they're detecting and are returning a high
rate of false alarms, Breaking Defense reports. In addition, it is proving
difficult to integrate the "threat" data into the fighter's onboard software.

In order to make the alerts more accurate, the plane's system will require
highly complex sets of files - called a "threat library" - which then must be
incorporated into the onboard system. Creating that "library" requires
coordination of data from all across the military's intelligence community, a
highly complex operation in itself.

The 2014 annual report by the director of Operational Test and Evaluation, Dr.
J. Michael Gilmore concluded that, despite improvements to the software,
"fusion of information from own-ship sensors, as well as fusion of information
from off-board sensors is still deficient. The Distributed Aperture System
continues to exhibit high false-alarm rates and false target tracks, and poor
stability performance, even in later versions of software."

Thomas Lawhead, a civilian involved in integrating the F-35 for the Air Force,
agreed that the fighter's warning system "is still a little too sensitive,"
and that the threat information probably won't be ready until just before the
planes are scheduled to become operational.

There are different versions of the fighter being developed and the one
scheduled to be operational first is the Marine's F-35B which is slated to
debut in the summer of 2015. The Navy's is currently expected in 2018, if all
goes well.

"Flying Swiss Army Knife" to Cost $1 Trillion

But if history is any guide, there's plenty of reason to believe all will not
go well. Since the program to develop the fighter jet began in 2001, it has
seen costs soar even as deadlines are pushed back repeatedly. Senator John
McCain (R-AZ) - hardly known as an outspoken critic of the military - called
the program "one of the great national scandals that we have ever had, as far
as the expenditure of taxpayers' dollars are concerned."

The program has already nearly doubled its original budget to $400 billion
dollars in spending - making it the most expensive plane in history. And that
doesn't take into account the $5 billion or so the military has spent to
extend the existing fleets this plane was supposed to replace or the $650
billion or so in maintenance costs the Government Accountability Office has
estimated will be necessary, which would bring the total cost to well over $1
trillion dollars over the next few decades.

Many attribute the difficulties of the program with the overzealous demands
from all branches of the military to incorporate features to suit their
particular needs all in one plane, with some calling it the Flying Swiss Army
Knife. The F-35 is supposed to be a bomber, a fighter, and capable of
performing ground support, but some of those capabilities have contradictory
needs. Add to it a load of highly complex computer systems and by trying to
please everyone, it may end up performing for no one.

In 2008 the RAND corporation - a think tank that works closely with the US
military - reported on a series of war simulations involving the F-35 and
their analysis was leaked to the press with its pessimistic conclusions.
"Inferior acceleration, inferior climb [rate], inferior sustained turn
capability," the analysts wrote. "Also has lower top speed. Can't turn, can't
climb, can't run."

Just recently, another software related error was announced, which means that
the fighter won't be able to fire its primary guns until 2019. It will also
not have the necessary software to operate one of its precision guided bombs
until 2022.

There's also been a lot of concern over the possibility that this supposed
state-of-the-art stealth fighter - supposedly designed to evade detection
through its size and special coatings - isn't actually very stealthy. Reports
in 2014 indicated that the F-35 might actually be vulnerable to Chinese and
Russian advances in radar technology.

The planes were also rushed into production before design was even completed,
meaning the military has spent billions of fixing already produced aircraft
that were faulty.

"This will make a headline if I say it, but I'm going to say it anyway," Frank
Kendall, a top Pentagon official, said in 2012. "Putting the F-35 into
production years before the first test flight was acquisition malpractice. It
should not have been done."
Post by Oleg Smirnov
<http://russia-insider.com/en/military/2014/11/04/02-05-14pm/latest_russian_fighter_jet_blows_americas_away>
The Latest Russian Fighter Jet Blows America's Away
Outgunned by the Su-30 family of aircraft and suffering critical design
flaws, the American F-35 is staring down the barrel of obsolescence - and
punching a gaping hole in western air defences.
Daryl
2015-03-13 08:50:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
sputniknews is solely owned by the Russian Government. The real owner
is Rossiya Segodnya which is a division of the Russian Government. It
was launched in 2014 by a special presidential (Putin) decree.
Misinformation is a wonderful thing.

Now that India has let us know that the PKA-50 Russian Stealth Fighter
is slow, can't turn, weapons aren't working so well, it may look like
it's stealthy but it's still a 4.5 gen fighter, the engines are crap,
the radar is strictly from the 80s, and more. And the Indians are
telling Russia to get it finished or they take their billions elsewhere.
And guess where those billions end up going.
Post by Oleg Smirnov
<http://sputniknews.com/military/20150313/1019429096.html>
More Money, More Problems: F-35 Software Overwhelmed With False Alarms
MILITARY & INTELLIGENCE 03:24 13.03.2015 (updated 08:53 13.03.2015)
New problems - namely, false alarms from overly sensitive threat-detecting
sensors - have arisen with the beleaguered F-35 aircraft, so far the most
expensive, and problem-ridden, piece of military equipment in US history.
The sensors on the fighter that are supposed to detect threats - like incoming
missiles - often don't know what they're detecting and are returning a high
rate of false alarms, Breaking Defense reports. In addition, it is proving
difficult to integrate the "threat" data into the fighter's onboard software.
In order to make the alerts more accurate, the plane's system will require
highly complex sets of files - called a "threat library" - which then must be
incorporated into the onboard system. Creating that "library" requires
coordination of data from all across the military's intelligence community, a
highly complex operation in itself.
The 2014 annual report by the director of Operational Test and
Evaluation, Dr.
J. Michael Gilmore concluded that, despite improvements to the software,
"fusion of information from own-ship sensors, as well as fusion of information
from off-board sensors is still deficient. The Distributed Aperture System
continues to exhibit high false-alarm rates and false target tracks, and poor
stability performance, even in later versions of software."
Thomas Lawhead, a civilian involved in integrating the F-35 for the Air Force,
agreed that the fighter's warning system "is still a little too sensitive,"
and that the threat information probably won't be ready until just before the
planes are scheduled to become operational.
There are different versions of the fighter being developed and the one
scheduled to be operational first is the Marine's F-35B which is slated to
debut in the summer of 2015. The Navy's is currently expected in 2018, if all
goes well.
"Flying Swiss Army Knife" to Cost $1 Trillion
But if history is any guide, there's plenty of reason to believe all will not
go well. Since the program to develop the fighter jet began in 2001, it has
seen costs soar even as deadlines are pushed back repeatedly. Senator John
McCain (R-AZ) - hardly known as an outspoken critic of the military - called
the program "one of the great national scandals that we have ever had, as far
as the expenditure of taxpayers' dollars are concerned."
The program has already nearly doubled its original budget to $400 billion
dollars in spending - making it the most expensive plane in history. And that
doesn't take into account the $5 billion or so the military has spent to
extend the existing fleets this plane was supposed to replace or the $650
billion or so in maintenance costs the Government Accountability Office has
estimated will be necessary, which would bring the total cost to well over $1
trillion dollars over the next few decades.
Many attribute the difficulties of the program with the overzealous demands
from all branches of the military to incorporate features to suit their
particular needs all in one plane, with some calling it the Flying Swiss Army
Knife. The F-35 is supposed to be a bomber, a fighter, and capable of
performing ground support, but some of those capabilities have
contradictory
needs. Add to it a load of highly complex computer systems and by trying to
please everyone, it may end up performing for no one.
In 2008 the RAND corporation - a think tank that works closely with the US
military - reported on a series of war simulations involving the F-35 and
their analysis was leaked to the press with its pessimistic conclusions.
"Inferior acceleration, inferior climb [rate], inferior sustained turn
capability," the analysts wrote. "Also has lower top speed. Can't turn, can't
climb, can't run."
Just recently, another software related error was announced, which means that
the fighter won't be able to fire its primary guns until 2019. It will also
not have the necessary software to operate one of its precision guided bombs
until 2022.
There's also been a lot of concern over the possibility that this supposed
state-of-the-art stealth fighter - supposedly designed to evade detection
through its size and special coatings - isn't actually very stealthy. Reports
in 2014 indicated that the F-35 might actually be vulnerable to Chinese and
Russian advances in radar technology.
The planes were also rushed into production before design was even completed,
meaning the military has spent billions of fixing already produced aircraft
that were faulty.
"This will make a headline if I say it, but I'm going to say it anyway," Frank
Kendall, a top Pentagon official, said in 2012. "Putting the F-35 into
production years before the first test flight was acquisition
malpractice. It
should not have been done."
Post by Oleg Smirnov
<http://russia-insider.com/en/military/2014/11/04/02-05-14pm/latest_russian_fighter_jet_blows_americas_away>
The Latest Russian Fighter Jet Blows America's Away
Outgunned by the Su-30 family of aircraft and suffering critical design
flaws, the American F-35 is staring down the barrel of obsolescence - and
punching a gaping hole in western air defences.
--
Visit http://droopyvids.com for free TV and Movies. One of
the Largest Collections of Public Domain and Classic TV on
the Internet.
Richard Brooks
2015-03-13 14:06:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Daryl
sputniknews is solely owned by the Russian Government. The real owner
is Rossiya Segodnya which is a division of the Russian Government.
It was launched in 2014 by a special presidential (Putin) decree.
Misinformation is a wonderful thing.
Now that India has let us know that the PKA-50 Russian Stealth Fighter
is slow, can't turn, weapons aren't working so well, it may look like
it's stealthy but it's still a 4.5 gen fighter, the engines are crap,
the radar is strictly from the 80s, and more. And the Indians are
telling Russia to get it finished or they take their billions
elsewhere. And guess where those billions end up going.
Don't forget that the F-35 is good for Thanksgiving only.

"According to the Pierre Sprey, co-designer of the F-16, the F35 is a
turkey"

<http://sploid.gizmodo.com/the-designer-of-the-f-16-explains-why-the-f-35-is-such-1591828468>
Jim Wilkins
2015-03-13 15:31:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Richard Brooks
Post by Daryl
sputniknews is solely owned by the Russian Government. The real owner
is Rossiya Segodnya which is a division of the Russian Government.
It was launched in 2014 by a special presidential (Putin) decree.
Misinformation is a wonderful thing.
Now that India has let us know that the PKA-50 Russian Stealth Fighter
is slow, can't turn, weapons aren't working so well, it may look like
it's stealthy but it's still a 4.5 gen fighter, the engines are crap,
the radar is strictly from the 80s, and more. And the Indians are
telling Russia to get it finished or they take their billions
elsewhere. And guess where those billions end up going.
Don't forget that the F-35 is good for Thanksgiving only.
"According to the Pierre Sprey, co-designer of the F-16, the F35 is
a turkey"
<http://sploid.gizmodo.com/the-designer-of-the-f-16-explains-why-the-f-35-is-such-1591828468>
Sprey dismisses all multi-mission fighters and advanced electronics.
http://www.tank-net.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=21483

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