Discussion:
Fastest rate of climb?
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t***@gmail.com
2015-06-27 15:49:39 UTC
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The B1 English Electric Lightning holds this record look on YouTube and compare to su 27 and the F15 and you judge for yourself.
2***@gmail.com
2017-08-10 09:40:53 UTC
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What aircraft has the fastest rate of climb? Where does the English
Electric Lightning feature historically?
Best regards, Ken Doerr
I notice the Seppo aircaft are all stripped down variants as well as Ivans. The English Electric Lightenings rate of climb was something like 50.000 ft/min unmodified, The septics wont like that and of course will come up with some bullshit story to make them look better so they can stroke their own egos.
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Before you buy.
Daryl
2017-08-10 16:54:50 UTC
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What aircraft has the fastest rate of climb? Where does the English
Electric Lightning feature historically?
Best regards, Ken Doerr
I notice the Seppo aircaft are all stripped down variants as well as Ivans. The English Electric Lightenings rate of climb was something like 50.000 ft/min unmodified, The septics wont like that and of course will come up with some bullshit story to make them look better so they can stroke their own egos.
Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.
What killed the Electric Lightning? The F-104 and the over estimation
of a Lightnings performance. Even the F-104 couldn't reach 50k a minute
climb. The best a production model 104 could do was 48K while the
Lightning barely broke 20K.




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Jim Wilkins
2017-08-10 19:53:55 UTC
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Post by Daryl
What aircraft has the fastest rate of climb? Where does the
English
Electric Lightning feature historically?
Best regards, Ken Doerr
I notice the Seppo aircaft are all stripped down variants as well
as Ivans. The English Electric Lightenings rate of climb was
something like 50.000 ft/min unmodified, The septics wont like
that and of course will come up with some bullshit story to make
them look better so they can stroke their own egos.
Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.
What killed the Electric Lightning? The F-104 and the over
estimation of a Lightnings performance. Even the F-104 couldn't
reach 50k a minute climb. The best a production model 104 could do
was 48K while the Lightning barely broke 20K.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_Electric_Lightning
"The Lightning's optimum climb profile required the use of
afterburners during takeoff. Immediately after takeoff, the nose would
be lowered for rapid acceleration to 430 knots (800 km/h) IAS before
initiating a climb, stabilising at 450 knots (830 km/h). This would
yield a constant climb rate of approximately 20,000 ft/min (100 m/s)."

"A Lightning flying at optimum climb profile would reach 36,000 ft
(11,000 m) in under three minutes."
Keith Willshaw
2017-08-10 20:36:46 UTC
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Post by Daryl
What killed the Electric Lightning? The F-104 and the over estimation
of a Lightnings performance. Even the F-104 couldn't reach 50k a minute
climb. The best a production model 104 could do was 48K while the
Lightning barely broke 20K.
You have misunderstood a few things here.

1) The lightning was never expected to achieve 50 thousand feet per
minute. The spec (ER 103) called for a max combat altitude of 35
thousand feet and a mach number of 1.5. The Lightning handily exceeded
that with a ceiling of 50,000 ft and Mach 2.0

2) It was designed specifically as a high altitude missile armed
interceptor that in wartime could reach soviet nuclear bombers before
they got within weapons range of V Bomber bases. It stayed in service
until the late 1980's and the F-104 never entered service with the RAF.
The aircraft that replaced it in the intercept role were the Phantom
FGR.2 and Tornado F3.

In service it was intended to be complemented by the Gloster Javelin in
the medium to long distance all weather intercept role, the nearest US
aircraft would be the F-102. In retrospect the RN Sea Vixen would have
been a better choice being faster and more stable. In the event the
improvement in performance of later marks of Lightning saw the Javelin
withdrawn from service in 1965.

Note that in 1962 a Lightning successfully intercepted a U-2 at 65,000
ft and in 1984 a Lightning managed to reach 88,000 ft in a ballistic climb

Exercises in Germany showed the he F-104 and Lightning to have broadly
comparable climb rates of 20k per minute. Neither could achieve anything
like 40 k per minute. Optimum time for an operational Lightning to reach
36,000 ft was 3 minutes. It could get there quicker but only under full
afterburner which basically meant declaring a fuel emergency.

YF-104 time to climb records set in 1958 are as follows, these aircraft
were specially prepared an not service aircraft

3,000 metres (9,800 ft) in 41.85 seconds
6,000 metres (19,700 ft) in 58.41 seconds
9,000 metres (29,500 ft) in 81.14 seconds
12,000 metres (39,400 ft) in 99.90 seconds
15,000 metres (49,200 ft) in 131.1 seconds
20,000 metres (65,600 ft) in 222.99 seconds
25,000 metres (82,000 ft) in 266.03 seconds

The F-104 did have rather better range than the Lightning and the F-15
was of course superior to both.

The F15 Streak Eagle set the following records

3,000 metres (9,800 ft) in 27.57 seconds
6,000 metres (19,700 ft) in 39.33 seconds
9,000 metres (29,500 ft) in 48.86 seconds
12,000 metres (39,400 ft) in 59.38 seconds
15,000 metres (49,200 ft) in 77.02 seconds
20,000 metres (65,600 ft) in 122.94 seconds
25,000 metres (82,000 ft) in 161.02 seconds


KeithW
Jim Wilkins
2017-08-10 21:32:52 UTC
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Post by Keith Willshaw
Post by Daryl
What killed the Electric Lightning? The F-104 and the over
estimation of a Lightnings performance. Even the F-104 couldn't
reach 50k a minute climb. The best a production model 104 could do
was 48K while the Lightning barely broke 20K.
You have misunderstood a few things here.
1) The lightning was never expected to achieve 50 thousand feet per
minute. The spec (ER 103) called for a max combat altitude of 35
thousand feet and a mach number of 1.5. The Lightning handily
exceeded that with a ceiling of 50,000 ft and Mach 2.0
2) It was designed specifically as a high altitude missile armed
interceptor that in wartime could reach soviet nuclear bombers
before they got within weapons range of V Bomber bases. It stayed in
service until the late 1980's and the F-104 never entered service
with the RAF. The aircraft that replaced it in the intercept role
were the Phantom FGR.2 and Tornado F3.
In service it was intended to be complemented by the Gloster Javelin
in the medium to long distance all weather intercept role, the
nearest US aircraft would be the F-102. In retrospect the RN Sea
Vixen would have been a better choice being faster and more stable.
In the event the improvement in performance of later marks of
Lightning saw the Javelin withdrawn from service in 1965.
Note that in 1962 a Lightning successfully intercepted a U-2 at
65,000 ft and in 1984 a Lightning managed to reach 88,000 ft in a
ballistic climb
Exercises in Germany showed the he F-104 and Lightning to have
broadly comparable climb rates of 20k per minute. Neither could
achieve anything like 40 k per minute. Optimum time for an
operational Lightning to reach 36,000 ft was 3 minutes. It could get
there quicker but only under full afterburner which basically meant
declaring a fuel emergency.
YF-104 time to climb records set in 1958 are as follows, these
aircraft were specially prepared an not service aircraft
3,000 metres (9,800 ft) in 41.85 seconds
6,000 metres (19,700 ft) in 58.41 seconds
9,000 metres (29,500 ft) in 81.14 seconds
12,000 metres (39,400 ft) in 99.90 seconds
15,000 metres (49,200 ft) in 131.1 seconds
20,000 metres (65,600 ft) in 222.99 seconds
25,000 metres (82,000 ft) in 266.03 seconds
The F-104 did have rather better range than the Lightning and the
F-15 was of course superior to both.
The F15 Streak Eagle set the following records
3,000 metres (9,800 ft) in 27.57 seconds
6,000 metres (19,700 ft) in 39.33 seconds
9,000 metres (29,500 ft) in 48.86 seconds
12,000 metres (39,400 ft) in 59.38 seconds
15,000 metres (49,200 ft) in 77.02 seconds
20,000 metres (65,600 ft) in 122.94 seconds
25,000 metres (82,000 ft) in 161.02 seconds
KeithW
The USA located radars across northern Canada to provide Distant Early
Warning. Was Britain able to arrange anything comparable?
-jsw
Keith Willshaw
2017-08-12 15:53:22 UTC
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Post by Jim Wilkins
The USA located radars across northern Canada to provide Distant Early
Warning. Was Britain able to arrange anything comparable?
-jsw
Yes indeed, in fact the RAF Fylingdales Early Warning station feeds
staright into NORAD and is part of BMEWS along with Thule Air Base,
Greenland and Clear Air Force Station, Alaska. A US Liason officer is
permanently stationed at Fylingdales. The structure for all this was set
up under the terms of the UK/USA agreement which mandates cooperation in
signals intelligence between Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United
Kingdom, and the United States. Allegedly it was one of the few
locations outside the USA connected into the Stone Ghost network.
Jim Wilkins
2017-08-10 21:58:38 UTC
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Post by Keith Willshaw
Post by Daryl
What killed the Electric Lightning? The F-104 and the over
estimation of a Lightnings performance. Even the F-104 couldn't
reach 50k a minute climb. The best a production model 104 could do
was 48K while the Lightning barely broke 20K.
You have misunderstood a few things here.
1) The lightning was never expected to achieve 50 thousand feet per
minute. The spec (ER 103) called for a max combat altitude of 35
thousand feet and a mach number of 1.5. The Lightning handily
exceeded that with a ceiling of 50,000 ft and Mach 2.0
2) It was designed specifically as a high altitude missile armed
interceptor that in wartime could reach soviet nuclear bombers
before they got within weapons range of V Bomber bases. It stayed in
service until the late 1980's and the F-104 never entered service
with the RAF. The aircraft that replaced it in the intercept role
were the Phantom FGR.2 and Tornado F3.
In service it was intended to be complemented by the Gloster Javelin
in the medium to long distance all weather intercept role, the
nearest US aircraft would be the F-102. In retrospect the RN Sea
Vixen would have been a better choice being faster and more stable.
In the event the improvement in performance of later marks of
Lightning saw the Javelin withdrawn from service in 1965.
Note that in 1962 a Lightning successfully intercepted a U-2 at
65,000 ft and in 1984 a Lightning managed to reach 88,000 ft in a
ballistic climb
Exercises in Germany showed the he F-104 and Lightning to have
broadly comparable climb rates of 20k per minute. Neither could
achieve anything like 40 k per minute. Optimum time for an
operational Lightning to reach 36,000 ft was 3 minutes. It could get
there quicker but only under full afterburner which basically meant
declaring a fuel emergency.
YF-104 time to climb records set in 1958 are as follows, these
aircraft were specially prepared an not service aircraft
3,000 metres (9,800 ft) in 41.85 seconds
6,000 metres (19,700 ft) in 58.41 seconds
9,000 metres (29,500 ft) in 81.14 seconds
12,000 metres (39,400 ft) in 99.90 seconds
15,000 metres (49,200 ft) in 131.1 seconds
20,000 metres (65,600 ft) in 222.99 seconds
25,000 metres (82,000 ft) in 266.03 seconds
The F-104 did have rather better range than the Lightning and the
F-15 was of course superior to both.
The F15 Streak Eagle set the following records
3,000 metres (9,800 ft) in 27.57 seconds
6,000 metres (19,700 ft) in 39.33 seconds
9,000 metres (29,500 ft) in 48.86 seconds
12,000 metres (39,400 ft) in 59.38 seconds
15,000 metres (49,200 ft) in 77.02 seconds
20,000 metres (65,600 ft) in 122.94 seconds
25,000 metres (82,000 ft) in 161.02 seconds
KeithW
The times to altitude for the Space Shuttle were almost identical to
the F15's up to 12,000 meters.
Greg Hennessy
2017-08-15 10:36:52 UTC
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On Thu, 10 Aug 2017 21:36:46 +0100, Keith Willshaw
Post by Keith Willshaw
The F-104 did have rather better range than the Lightning and the F-15
was of course superior to both.
Speaking of the F-104

Came across this in a search last week.

https://obittree.com/obituary/us/colorado/greeley/adamson-funeral--cremation-services/walter-bjorneby/2662433/

Wherever he is, hope there is a J79-19 on full chat getting him there.


G
--
?¡aah, los gringos otra vez!?
Peter Stickney
2017-08-30 04:47:44 UTC
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Post by Greg Hennessy
On Thu, 10 Aug 2017 21:36:46 +0100, Keith Willshaw
Post by Keith Willshaw
The F-104 did have rather better range than the Lightning and the F-15
was of course superior to both.
Speaking of the F-104
Came across this in a search last week.
https://obittree.com/obituary/us/colorado/greeley/adamson-funeral--
cremation-services/walter-bjorneby/2662433/
Post by Greg Hennessy
Wherever he is, hope there is a J79-19 on full chat getting him there.
Blast and Damn!
God Speed, Walt!

--
Pete Stickney
“A strong conviction that something must be done is the parent of many
bad measures.” ― Daniel Webster
5***@gmail.com
2017-11-27 17:50:41 UTC
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What aircraft has the fastest rate of climb? Where does the English
Electric Lightning feature historically?
Best regards, Ken Doerr
Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.
what about some of those migs trying the mach Loop?

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