Discussion:
The U.S. Marine Corps Uses the 'Rule of 3' to Organize Almost Everything
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a425couple
2019-10-10 22:32:39 UTC
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https://www.inc.com/bill-murphy-jr/the-us-marine-corps-uses-rule-of-3-to-organize-almost-everything-heres-how-learning-it-21-years-ago-changed-my-life.html

The U.S. Marine Corps Uses the 'Rule of 3' to Organize Almost
Everything. Here's How Learning It 21 Years Ago Changed My Life
It all started with a copy of Inc. magazine that my dad handed me back
in 1998.
By Bill Murphy ***@BillMurphyJr

GETTY IMAGES
This is a story about the U.S. Marine Corps, the Rule of 3, and how to
avoid getting overwhelmed.

It's also about the first article I ever remember reading in Inc.
magazine back in 1998 -- and how that simple rule has served me well and
helped me accomplish my goals for more than 21 years.

The article was headlined "Corps Values," and it said this:

The U.S. Marines are trained to make split-second decisions based on
incomplete information, in life-or-death situations. Can they provide
clues to running a faster-reacting business?

Here's the part I remembered almost verbatim, even before looking it up
to write about it today:

In a nutshell, the rule is this: each marine has three things to worry
about.

In terms of organizational structure, the "rule of three" means a
corporal has a three-person fire team; a sergeant has a squad of three
fire teams; a lieutenant and a staff sergeant have a platoon of three
squads; and so on, up to generals.

The functional version of the rule dictates that a person should limit
his or her attention to three tasks or goals. When applied to
strategizing, the rule prescribes boiling a world of infinite
possibilities down to three alternative courses of action.

Anything more, and a marine can become overextended and confused. The
marines experimented with a rule of four and found that effectiveness
plummeted.

There are three reasons why this has stayed with me so long. (Yes, three!)

The first reason is the Rule of 3 itself. I've used it almost
automatically since reading that article. I've found that for me too,
three the maximum number of things I can focus on at once.

Right now, for example, I have three professional projects: my work for
Inc., plus a new publication I'm launching called Understandably, and a
digital technology product that I'm developing with a colleague. More
projects than that would just be too much.

The second reason I remember it so well is simply because it was in Inc.
magazine. I've been a loyal reader going back many years. I'd started a
couple of small businesses by then, but this publication was a big way
that I stayed connected to my entrepreneurial dreams in those days. It's
pretty wild to me that I write for it now.

Finally, there's how I happened to have read it: I had just moved to
Washington for my first job as a lawyer. My brother had just gotten out
of the Marines and was living with me. And it was my dad who gave me the
magazine with this article on the cover: He and my mom were visiting,
and it was something to read while I was waiting for them at their hotel.

It's not just the Marine Corps that recognizes the Rule of 3. More
recently, my Inc.com colleague Jessica Stillman tackled it from a
different perspective: "Work, Sleep, Family, Fitness, or Friends: Pick 3."

And throughout history, great communicators have known that the Rule of
3 makes messages more memorable -- and sometimes even funny. It's the
linguistic theory behind everything from "Veni, vidi, vici" to The Three
Little Pigs.

Since this article stayed with me so long, I thought I'd reach out to
its author, David H. Freedman. He told me the story led to him writing a
book called Corps Business.

Glad you reached out. Funny, and of course gratifying, that you remember
that article. [It] came about when I was visiting in-laws, and went out
for a jog with my brother-in-law, who was a captain in the Navy Reserve.

Knowing that I wrote for Inc., he told me I should write an article
about Marine management wisdom, and as an example he gave me the rule of
3. I was sold on the spot, and contacted the Marines soon after.

It's a simple rule, easy to remember, and I think it's truly helped me
stay focused. Hey, what do you know: that's another list of three.

PUBLISHED ON: OCT 10, 2019
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2019-10-11 01:15:23 UTC
Permalink
The marines were generally the first ones to throw their legs in the air for a hot beef injection.
Leper
2019-10-11 11:35:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
The marines were generally the first ones to throw their legs in the air
for a hot beef injection.
So the Marines rejected your rancid blowjobs, eh?
--
Machiavelli wrote:It is necessary for the state to deal in lies and half
truths,
because people are made up of lies and half truths. Even Princes.' And
certainly, by definition all Ambassadors and politicians
Casa de Masa
2019-10-11 12:11:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leper
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
The marines were generally the first ones to throw their legs in the air
for a hot beef injection.
So the Marines rejected your rancid blowjobs, eh?
Ever see him in his tutu?

https://imgur.com/lrQvLto

He's also a child molester, check out
this post from the useless wankstain:

https://tinyurl.com/yy5wk68t
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2019-10-11 12:31:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leper
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
The marines were generally the first ones to throw their legs in the air for a hot beef injection.
So the Marines rejected your rancid blowjobs, eh?
Are you coming on to me, sailor??
Show some respect. After all, I'm a full burd colonel.
NEMO
2019-10-11 13:36:10 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 11 Oct 2019 05:31:19 -0700, "fake vet Afro-Eyetalian Scatboi
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Leper
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
The marines were generally the first ones to throw their legs in the air for a hot beef injection.
So the Marines rejected your rancid blowjobs, eh?
Are you coming on to me, sailor??
Show some respect. After all, I'm a full burd colonel.
Surely you mean a fulla turd colon?
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2019-10-11 14:15:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by NEMO
On Fri, 11 Oct 2019 05:31:19 -0700, "fake vet Afro-Eyetalian Scatboi
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Leper
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
The marines were generally the first ones to throw their legs in the air for a hot beef injection.
So the Marines rejected your rancid blowjobs, eh?
Are you coming on to me, sailor??
Show some respect. After all, I'm a full burd colonel.
Surely you mean a fulla turd colon?
You mammy gimme good head, lol!
Loading Image...
NEMO
2019-10-11 15:48:33 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 11 Oct 2019 07:15:15 -0700, "fake vet Afro-Eyetalian Scatboi
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by NEMO
On Fri, 11 Oct 2019 05:31:19 -0700, "fake vet Afro-Eyetalian Scatboi
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Leper
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
The marines were generally the first ones to throw their legs in the air for a hot beef injection.
So the Marines rejected your rancid blowjobs, eh?
Are you coming on to me, sailor??
Show some respect. After all, I'm a full burd colonel.
Surely you mean a fulla turd colon?
You mammy gimme good head, lol!
http://www.tacamateurs.com/whatsnewpics2/21848/1.jpg
YOU mammy give EVERYONE good head! LOLOK
Leper
2019-10-11 19:57:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Leper
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
The marines were generally the first ones to throw their legs in the
air for a hot beef injection.
So the Marines rejected your rancid blowjobs, eh?
Are you coming on to me, sailor??
Show some respect.  After all, I'm a full turd colon.
fer sure.
--
Machiavelli wrote:It is necessary for the state to deal in lies and half
truths,
because people are made up of lies and half truths. Even Princes.' And
certainly, by definition all Ambassadors and politicians
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