Discussion:
Has anyone here read the WEB Griffin books?
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a425couple
2020-08-12 16:23:10 UTC
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Has anyone here read the WEB Griffin books?

WEB Griffin, aka Butterworth, has written a fair number
of series. I've read his series on US Marines
(pre WWII through Vietnam), Army (1943 to Vietnam),
and occasionally about Philly Police Work.

I like him because he has a pretty good and realistic
view of both military and police work. He certainly
does a lot of serious research.
Jim Wilkins
2020-08-12 23:09:50 UTC
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"a425couple" wrote in message news:***@news1.newsguy.com...

Has anyone here read the WEB Griffin books?

WEB Griffin, aka Butterworth, has written a fair number
of series. I've read his series on US Marines
(pre WWII through Vietnam), Army (1943 to Vietnam),
and occasionally about Philly Police Work.

I like him because he has a pretty good and realistic
view of both military and police work. He certainly
does a lot of serious research.

=========================

I switched from fiction to fact long ago, to avoid confusing them. Some
battles were too random and illogical to sell as fiction.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Waterloo

Although Victor Hugo made a colorful attempt in Les Miserables:
http://www.ombredor.com/dbksskbd/waterloo.html

General Cambronne flatly denied saying what Hugo made him famous for.
Actually a British cavalry general personally caught him reconnoitering
outside the infantry square and ingloriously dragged him back to their
lines.
a425couple
2020-08-13 02:56:03 UTC
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Post by a425couple
Has anyone here read the WEB Griffin books?
WEB Griffin, aka Butterworth, has written a fair number
of series.  I've read his series on US Marines
(pre WWII through Vietnam), Army (1943 to Vietnam),
and occasionally about Philly Police Work.
I like him because he has a pretty good and realistic
view of both military and police work.  He certainly
does a lot of serious research.
=========================
I switched from fiction to fact long ago, to avoid confusing them.
For many years I also did not read fiction.
Pretty much for the same reason.
Post by a425couple
Some
battles were too random and illogical to sell as fiction.
That reminds me, in one of WEB Griffin's army books,
he has a figure (clearly loosely based on General Patton)
that sends a special task organized unit on a raid
to rescue the General's son in law. I thought it
was OK. But then later I read about the real raid,
and Griffin's fiction made a lot more sense then the
real deal.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Task_Force_Baum#:~:text=Task%20Force%20Baum%20was%20a,XIII%2DB%2C%20near%20Hammelburg.
"Task Force Baum was a secret and controversial World War II
task force set up by U.S. Army general George S. Patton and
commanded by Capt. Abraham Baum in late March 1945. Baum was
given the task of penetrating 50 miles (80 km) behind German
lines and liberating the POWs in camp OFLAG XIII-B, near
Hammelburg. Controversy surrounds the true reasons behind
the mission ----"

http://taskforcebaum.de/main1.html
Interesting pictures, opinions, and map.

https://warfarehistorynetwork.com/2018/12/28/witnessing-pattons-failure-a-prisoners-view-of-the-task-force-baum-raid/
"Witnessing Patton’s Failure: A Prisoner’s View of the Task Force
Baum Raid
As a POW in Oflag XIII-B, Lieutenant Herndon Inge, Jr., had a front-row
seat to Operation Baum, the disastrous attempt to liberate the camp."
'But, as Patton’s biographer Carlo D’Este noted, “Hammelburg was
the least defensible decision [Patton] ever made, and nearly as
self-destructive as the slappings [of American soldiers in Sicily]….
Hammelburg has become an enduring stain on Patton’s reputation.” '

Good book about it =
Raid --- The Untold Story of Patton's Secret Mission By Richard Baron,
Abe Baum and Richard Goldhurst; New York: G.P.Putnam's Sons, 1981
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0024CEYK4/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

and there is even a youtube

Task Force Baum - Patton's Insane Rescue Mission 1945
Mark Felton Productions
842K subscribers
In March 1945 General Patton ordered a lightning fast mission behind
German lines by a small task force from the US 4th Armored Division -
its objective - to liberate hundreds of American POWs in a camp 40 miles
inside German territory. So began Task Force Baum, Patton's 'mission too
far'.
Jim Wilkins
2020-08-13 11:10:58 UTC
Permalink
"a425couple" wrote in message news:***@news1.newsguy.com...
...
In March 1945 General Patton ordered a lightning fast mission behind
German lines by a small task force from the US 4th Armored Division -
its objective - to liberate hundreds of American POWs in a camp 40 miles
inside German territory. So began Task Force Baum, Patton's 'mission too
far'.
=========================================
In January and February 1945 US troops and Filipino guerillas had
successfully liberated two prison camps behind Japanese lines.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raid_at_Cabanatuan

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raid_on_Los_Ba%C3%B1os
"It has been celebrated as one of the most successful rescue operations in
modern military history."

https://hogansheroes.fandom.com/wiki/Stalag_13

Both Patton and MacArthur had earned reputations for daring raids in Mexico.
Could Patton do less now?
https://www.historynet.com/douglas-macarthurs-mexican-heroics.htm
https://www.wearethemighty.com/history/patton-leads-first-armor-attack
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2020-08-13 14:04:34 UTC
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Post by a425couple
Has anyone here read the WEB Griffin books?
To whom is this directed?
I cunt tell since you've spammed a number of froups.

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