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Thoughts on "Odysseus in America: Combat Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming"
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a425couple
2019-10-21 22:48:25 UTC
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So, someone around here mentioned PTSD.
I have an interesting book I picked up a while ago.

"Odysseus in America: Combat Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming"
by Jonathan Shay

You can read plenty about it at:
https://www.amazon.com/Odysseus-America-Combat-Trauma-Homecoming-ebook/dp/B003L77X2M

Customers rate it at 4.6 out of 5.

And Goodreads rates it at a very high 4.2.
https://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/228460-odysseus-in-america-combat-trauma-and-the-trials-of-homecoming

49 customer reviews.
Or you can do the "LOOK INSIDE" and read free for a while.
If you really like it, You can even get one shipped to your
door for about $8.00.

The publishers blurb includes,
"In this ambitious follow-up to Achilles in Vietnam, Dr. Jonathan Shay
uses the Odyssey, the story of a soldier's homecoming, to illuminate
the pitfalls that trap many veterans on the road back to civilian life.

Seamlessly combining important psychological work and brilliant
literary interpretation with an impassioned plea to renovate American
military institutions, Shay deepens our understanding of both the
combat veteran's experience and one of the world's greatest classics."

Here is an editorial review
From Publishers Weekly
It's not exactly a secret that those returning from war often have
difficulties adjusting to the peaceful life at home. Nor is it a secret
that hundreds of thousands of Vietnam veterans have had emotionally
rocky homecomings. The main reasons Vietnam veterans have suffered
disproportionately have been identified in many books. Shay (Achilles in
Vietnam), a Tufts Medical School faculty member, serves as a Veterans
Administration psychiatrist administering to emotionally troubled
Vietnam veterans and offers his second study engaging the Homeric epics,
The Iliad and The Odyssey, in order to describe and explain veterans'
plight. Shay presents an amalgam of scholarly Homeric interpretation and
case studies of maladjusted Vietnam veterans, arguing that leaders-from
top policy makers to drill instructors-hold the key to preventing many
psychological problems in the military. He advocates fostering a climate
of community at the unit level by training and supporting competent,
open-minded, ethical military leaders who have the full support of their
superiors. While it's an intriguing argument, the case studies do not
contribute to existing literature, and the tone of the book-which
contains countless italicized words and phrases-comes off too often as
hectoring or stridently didactic. Readers with a working knowledge of
The Odyssey and a familiarity with the effects of PTSD among Americans
who served in the Vietnam War may get the most out of this book, which
could affect policy if it finds its way to upper echelons of command.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

And another
From Publishers Weekly
It's not exactly a secret that those returning from war often have
difficulties adjusting to the peaceful life at home. Nor is it a secret
that hundreds of thousands of Vietnam veterans have had emotionally
rocky homecomings. The main reasons Vietnam veterans have suffered
disproportionately have been identified in many books. Shay (Achilles in
Vietnam), a Tufts Medical School faculty member, serves as a Veterans
Administration psychiatrist administering to emotionally troubled
Vietnam veterans and offers his second study engaging the Homeric epics,
The Iliad and The Odyssey, in order to describe and explain veterans'
plight. Shay presents an amalgam of scholarly Homeric interpretation and
case studies of maladjusted Vietnam veterans, arguing that leaders-from
top policy makers to drill instructors-hold the key to preventing many
psychological problems in the military. He advocates fostering a climate
of community at the unit level by training and supporting competent,
open-minded, ethical military leaders who have the full support of their
superiors. While it's an intriguing argument, the case studies do not
contribute to existing literature, and the tone of the book-which
contains countless italicized words and phrases-comes off too often as
hectoring or stridently didactic. Readers with a working knowledge of
The Odyssey and a familiarity with the effects of PTSD among Americans
who served in the Vietnam War may get the most out of this book, which
could affect policy if it finds its way to upper echelons of command.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2019-10-22 15:10:29 UTC
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Permalink
http://amerigentleman.blogspot.com/2014/12/feminism-vietnam-war-and-vietnam-veteran.html
It discusses, from a men's rights perspective, the Vietnam war and Vietnam veterans and issues related to the same.
I believe Mucus is one of those closet-case faggots. Once, a few years ago, I caught him poasting pics of muscle guys working out with weights. A respondent asks him if he were gay.
That was a good LOL.
3-legged Chinook ™
2019-10-22 22:32:54 UTC
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Permalink
Post by a425couple
So, someone around here mentioned PTSD.
I have an interesting book I picked up a while ago.
"Odysseus in America: Combat Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming"
by Jonathan Shay
https://www.amazon.com/Odysseus-America-Combat-Trauma-Homecoming-ebook/dp/B003L77X2M
Customers rate it at 4.6 out of 5.
And Goodreads rates it at a very high 4.2.
https://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/228460-odysseus-in-america-combat-trauma-and-the-trials-of-homecoming
49 customer reviews.
Or you can do the "LOOK INSIDE" and read free for a while.
If you really like it, You can even get one shipped to your
door for about $8.00.
The publishers blurb includes,
"In this ambitious follow-up to Achilles in Vietnam, Dr. Jonathan Shay
uses the Odyssey, the story of a soldier's homecoming, to illuminate
the pitfalls that trap many veterans on the road back to civilian life.
Seamlessly combining important psychological work and brilliant
literary interpretation with an impassioned plea to renovate American
military institutions, Shay deepens our understanding of both the
combat veteran's experience and one of the world's greatest classics."
Here is an editorial review
From Publishers Weekly
It's not exactly a secret that those returning from war often have
difficulties adjusting to the peaceful life at home. Nor is it a secret
that hundreds of thousands of Vietnam veterans have had emotionally
rocky homecomings. The main reasons Vietnam veterans have suffered
disproportionately have been identified in many books. Shay (Achilles in
Vietnam), a Tufts Medical School faculty member, serves as a Veterans
Administration psychiatrist administering to emotionally troubled
Vietnam veterans and offers his second study engaging the Homeric epics,
The Iliad and The Odyssey, in order to describe and explain veterans'
plight. Shay presents an amalgam of scholarly Homeric interpretation and
case studies of maladjusted Vietnam veterans, arguing that leaders-from
top policy makers to drill instructors-hold the key to preventing many
psychological problems in the military. He advocates fostering a climate
of community at the unit level by training and supporting competent,
open-minded, ethical military leaders who have the full support of their
superiors. While it's an intriguing argument, the case studies do not
contribute to existing literature, and the tone of the book-which
contains countless italicized words and phrases-comes off too often as
hectoring or stridently didactic. Readers with a working knowledge of
The Odyssey and a familiarity with the effects of PTSD among Americans
who served in the Vietnam War may get the most out of this book, which
could affect policy if it finds its way to upper echelons of command.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.
And another
From Publishers Weekly
It's not exactly a secret that those returning from war often have
difficulties adjusting to the peaceful life at home. Nor is it a secret
that hundreds of thousands of Vietnam veterans have had emotionally
rocky homecomings. The main reasons Vietnam veterans have suffered
disproportionately have been identified in many books. Shay (Achilles in
Vietnam), a Tufts Medical School faculty member, serves as a Veterans
Administration psychiatrist administering to emotionally troubled
Vietnam veterans and offers his second study engaging the Homeric epics,
The Iliad and The Odyssey, in order to describe and explain veterans'
plight. Shay presents an amalgam of scholarly Homeric interpretation and
case studies of maladjusted Vietnam veterans, arguing that leaders-from
top policy makers to drill instructors-hold the key to preventing many
psychological problems in the military. He advocates fostering a climate
of community at the unit level by training and supporting competent,
open-minded, ethical military leaders who have the full support of their
superiors. While it's an intriguing argument, the case studies do not
contribute to existing literature, and the tone of the book-which
contains countless italicized words and phrases-comes off too often as
hectoring or stridently didactic. Readers with a working knowledge of
The Odyssey and a familiarity with the effects of PTSD among Americans
who served in the Vietnam War may get the most out of this book, which
could affect policy if it finds its way to upper echelons of command.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.
Jonathon is good Folk
--
-- my apologies. my left hand is semi-paralyzed from a botched VA
surgery...my brain, because of VA prescribed medication
a425couple
2019-10-23 02:56:53 UTC
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Permalink
Post by 3-legged Chinook ™
Post by a425couple
So, someone around here mentioned PTSD.
I have an interesting book I picked up a while ago.
"Odysseus in America: Combat Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming"
by Jonathan Shay
https://www.amazon.com/Odysseus-America-Combat-Trauma-Homecoming-ebook/dp/B003L77X2M
Customers rate it at 4.6 out of 5.
And Goodreads rates it at a very high 4.2.
https://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/228460-odysseus-in-america-combat-trauma-and-the-trials-of-homecoming
Jonathon is good Folk
OK. Is that opinion from his other books etc.,
or listening to him speak, or from meeting in person?
a425couple
2019-10-23 03:13:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by 3-legged Chinook ™
Post by a425couple
So, someone around here mentioned PTSD.
I have an interesting book I picked up a while ago.
"Odysseus in America: Combat Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming"
by Jonathan Shay
https://www.amazon.com/Odysseus-America-Combat-Trauma-Homecoming-ebook/dp/B003L77X2M
Customers rate it at 4.6 out of 5.
And Goodreads rates it at a very high 4.2.
https://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/228460-odysseus-in-america-combat-trauma-and-the-trials-of-homecoming
Jonathon is good Folk
OK.  Is that opinion from his other books etc.,
or listening to him speak, or from meeting in person?
I'd meant to include
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Shay

A few keys:
"Shay's research uncovered what may be the earliest historical reference
to PTSD, in Lady Percy's soliloquy in Henry IV, Part 1 (act 2, scene 3,
lines 40-62). Written around 1597, it represents an unusually accurate
description of the symptom constellation of PTSD.[12]

Shay has also done research on the use of Prozac in treating PTSD in
Vietnam veterans.[14]

Shay writes, "For years I have agitated against the diagnostic jargon
'Posttraumatic stress disorder' because transparently we are dealing
with an injury, not an illness, malady, disease, sickness, or disorder."[15]

Shay argues that PTSD is not an illness but the persistence of adaptive
behaviors needed to survive in a stressful environment. For example,
emotional numbing is useful in a disaster situation and maladaptive in a
family setting, and loss of trust enhances survival in a prison but not
in a community setting. Like Derek Summerfield, he also argues against
labeling and patronizing treatment. Shay recommends that we resocialize
trauma survivors as a means of promoting socially acceptable behavior
patterns.[16] He cites classical Greek theater[12] and the collective
mourning described in the Iliad as possible precedents.

Prevention of PTSD
Shay is a passionate advocate of improved mental health treatment for
soldiers and of more vigorous efforts to prevent PTSD,[10] in addition
to structural reform of the ways the U.S. armed forces are organized,
trained, and counseled. He has collaborated with General James Jones,
the past commandant of the Marines, and Major General James Mattis of
the Marines.[17]

Shay is respected in military circles, having conducted the Commandant
of the Marine Corps Trust Study (1999-2000); serving as Visiting
Scholar-at-Large at the U.S. Naval War College (2001); Chair of Ethics,
Leadership, and Personnel Policy in the Office of the U.S. Army Deputy
Chief of Staff for Personnel; and was Omar Bradley Chair of Strategic
Leadership at the US Army War College and Dickinson College (2008-2009).[
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