Discussion:
non-nuclear explosions at Alamagordo
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ZZyXX
2020-08-07 01:10:31 UTC
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where there ever any tests prior to Trinity of large non-nuclear explosives
Jim Wilkins
2020-08-07 02:08:34 UTC
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"ZZyXX" wrote in message news:rgi9m4$1p70$***@gioia.aioe.org...

where there ever any tests prior
to Trinity of large non-nuclear explosives
==============================

There was an instrumentation check test with 100 tons of TNT.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Largest_artificial_non-nuclear_explosions

Surprisingly Wiki missed this one:
http://thevane.gawker.com/july-10-1926-the-day-nature-blew-up-a-town-in-new-jer-1602586498
"More than 600,000 tons of explosives stored inside the depot detonated,..."

That's 600 kilotons, 0.6 Megaton, compared to 2.9 kilotons that destroyed
Halifax and ~12 kt at Hiroshima.
New Jersey was nuked but no one noticed?
Wolffan
2020-08-07 12:30:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by ZZyXX
where there ever any tests prior
to Trinity of large non-nuclear explosives
==============================
There was an instrumentation check test with 100 tons of TNT.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Largest_artificial_non-nuclear_explosions
http://thevane.gawker.com/july-10-1926-the-day-nature-blew-up-a-town-in-new-je
r-1602586498
"More than 600,000 tons of explosives stored inside the depot detonated,..."
That's 600 kilotons, 0.6 Megaton, compared to 2.9 kilotons that destroyed
Halifax and ~12 kt at Hiroshima.
New Jersey was nuked but no one noticed?
It’s _New Jersey_. Who could tell the difference?
ZZyXX
2020-08-07 18:28:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wolffan
Post by ZZyXX
where there ever any tests prior
to Trinity of large non-nuclear explosives
==============================
There was an instrumentation check test with 100 tons of TNT.
that's the one I was looking for. thanks
Post by Wolffan
Post by ZZyXX
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Largest_artificial_non-nuclear_explosions
http://thevane.gawker.com/july-10-1926-the-day-nature-blew-up-a-town-in-new-je
r-1602586498
"More than 600,000 tons of explosives stored inside the depot detonated,..."
That's 600 kilotons, 0.6 Megaton, compared to 2.9 kilotons that destroyed
Halifax and ~12 kt at Hiroshima.
New Jersey was nuked but no one noticed?
It’s _New Jersey_. Who could tell the difference?
Carl Kaufmann
2020-08-07 15:09:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by ZZyXX
where there ever any tests prior to Trinity of large non-nuclear
explosives ==============================
There was an instrumentation check test with 100 tons of TNT.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Largest_artificial_non-nuclear_explosions
http://thevane.gawker.com/july-10-1926-the-day-nature-blew-up-a-town-in-new-jer-1602586498
"More than 600,000 tons of explosives stored inside the depot
detonated,..."
That's 600 kilotons, 0.6 Megaton, compared to 2.9 kilotons that
destroyed Halifax and ~12 kt at Hiroshima. New Jersey was nuked
but no one noticed?
This article says pounds, not tons:
<https://www.nj.com/news/local/2011/07/glimpse_of_history_1926_explos.html>
Byker
2020-08-08 22:52:28 UTC
Permalink
No, they didn't: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Picatinny_Arsenal
"On July 10, 1926, lightning struck a Navy ammunition warehouse and started
a fire. As a result, several million pounds of explosives detonated over a
period of two or three days"
Post by Jim Wilkins
http://thevane.gawker.com/july-10-1926-the-day-nature-blew-up-a-town-in-new-jer-1602586498
"More than 600,000 tons of explosives stored inside the depot
detonated,..."
Over a period of two or three days. Hardly a single mighty blast.
Post by Jim Wilkins
That's 600 kilotons, 0.6 Megaton, compared to 2.9 kilotons that destroyed
Halifax
That sounds like a couple zeros too many. 600 tons I can believe, maybe
6,000 tons, but not 600,000 tons:


Half a megaton would have wiped Dover off the map.

Speaking of New Jersey:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Tom_explosion

Another forgotten big bang:

Jeff
2020-08-09 09:20:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Byker
No, they didn't: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Picatinny_Arsenal
"On July 10, 1926, lightning struck a Navy ammunition warehouse and started
a fire. As a result, several million pounds of explosives detonated over a
period of two or three days"
The "Surprisingly Wiki missed this one" referred to the list of Large
Non-Nuclear Explosions; but of course it was 'missed' because it was not
one large explosion as implied by the original article link.

Jeff
Jim Wilkins
2020-08-09 10:57:50 UTC
Permalink
No, they didn't: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Picatinny_Arsenal
"On July 10, 1926, lightning struck a Navy ammunition warehouse and started
a fire. As a result, several million pounds of explosives detonated over a
period of two or three days"
Post by Jim Wilkins
http://thevane.gawker.com/july-10-1926-the-day-nature-blew-up-a-town-in-new-jer-1602586498
"More than 600,000 tons of explosives stored inside the depot
detonated,..."
Over a period of two or three days. Hardly a single mighty blast.
Post by Jim Wilkins
That's 600 kilotons, 0.6 Megaton, compared to 2.9 kilotons that destroyed
Halifax
That sounds like a couple zeros too many. 600 tons I can believe, maybe
6,000 tons, but not 600,000 tons:
http://youtu.be/rADRj8xY9B8

Half a megaton would have wiped Dover off the map.

Speaking of New Jersey:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Tom_explosion

Another forgotten big bang:
http://youtu.be/LL0Bnx8H4Jk

============================================

Hatcher reported "over a million pounds of bulk t.n.t." for the first
explosion.

https://www.google.com/books/edition/Hatcher_s_Notebook/DtO3DAAAQBAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=hatcher%27s+notebook+lake+denmark+explosion&pg=PA522&printsec=frontcover

600,000 tons is obviously excessive to you and me but not to the copy
writer.
Jeff
2020-08-09 14:53:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Byker
That sounds like a couple zeros too many. 600 tons I can believe, maybe
http://youtu.be/rADRj8xY9B8
Half a megaton would have wiped Dover off the map.
It was 600 **pounds** not tons.

Jeff
Jeff
2020-08-09 14:55:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff
Post by Byker
That sounds like a couple zeros too many. 600 tons I can believe, maybe
http://youtu.be/rADRj8xY9B8
Half a megaton would have wiped Dover off the map.
It was 600 **pounds** not tons.
Jeff
oops the should read

It was 600,000 **pounds** not tons.

Jeff

Jim Wilkins
2020-08-07 02:08:34 UTC
Permalink
"ZZyXX" wrote in message news:rgi9m4$1p70$***@gioia.aioe.org...

where there ever any tests prior
to Trinity of large non-nuclear explosives
==============================

There was an instrumentation check test with 100 tons of TNT.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Largest_artificial_non-nuclear_explosions

Surprisingly Wiki missed this one:
http://thevane.gawker.com/july-10-1926-the-day-nature-blew-up-a-town-in-new-jer-1602586498
"More than 600,000 tons of explosives stored inside the depot detonated,..."

That's 600 kilotons, 0.6 Megaton, compared to 2.9 kilotons that destroyed
Halifax and ~12 kt at Hiroshima.
New Jersey was nuked but no one noticed?
Keith Willshaw
2020-08-09 12:49:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by ZZyXX
where there ever any tests prior to Trinity of large non-nuclear explosives
Well it was not a test but there was a very large explosion at an RAF
bomb dump in 1944 that produced an enormous crater.

"The RAF Fauld explosion was a military accident which occurred at 11:11
am on Monday, 27 November 1944 at the RAF Fauld underground munitions
storage depot. The RAF Fauld explosion was one of the largest
non-nuclear explosions in history and the largest to occur on UK soil.

Between 3,500 and 4,000 tonnes of ordnance exploded—mostly comprising
high explosive (HE)-filled bombs, but including a variety of other types
of weapons and including 500 million rounds of rifle ammunition. The
explosion crater with a depth of 300 feet (91 m) and 250 yards across is
still visible just south of Fauld, to the east of Hanbury in
Staffordshire, England. It is now known as the Hanbury Crater.

A nearby reservoir containing 450,000 cubic metres of water was
obliterated in the incident, along with several buildings including a
complete farm. Flooding caused by destruction of the reservoir added to
the damage directly caused by the explosion."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-stoke-staffordshire-30218324
https://www.msiac.nato.int/sites/default/files/media/accident_posters/msiac_accident_poster_12_-_raf_fauld_england_27_nov_1944.pdf
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