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Anna Kreisling Pacific Flyer Interview Part II
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Rob Arndt
2010-05-09 03:48:27 UTC
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FLYING THE JUNKERS 52/3m at STALINGRAD

By Jim Newsom

The following is an interview with Anna Kresiling - The White Wolf of
the Luftwaffe- of what it was like to fly the Junkers Ju-52/3m
trimotor in World War II.

James: How many Lady pilots flew with the Luftwaffe in World War II?
Anna: At the beginning of the war there were 50 pilots that flew
transport aircraft, and there were many more who trained our young
fledgling pilots, but both Hitler and Goering were against women
flying fighters and bombers in combat. In Russia there were many women
that flew fighters and bombers for Stalin.

James: I have flown in the Ford Trimotor, The Junkers Ju-52/3m has
always been one of my favorite airplanes, what was it like to fly?
Anna: The Junkers was an amazing and beautiful aircraft to fly! At
Stalingrad sometimes I made take-offs with only two engines running.
If you had only one engine running you could maintain altitude.
Visability was wonderful, but the Junkers was a complex aircraft and
you needed a great instructor if you wanted to learn quickly how to
fly the trimotor.

James: You mentioned STALINGRAD, was that the nightmare we read so
much about in history books?
Anna: Stalingrad was a living hell, but what happened at Crete was far
worse. For our airborne assault on Crete we had over 450 Junkers Ju-52
trimotors filled with paratroopers. We were told that we would not
encounter ack ack flak, and taking the island would be easy. However,
the island was filled with Australian, New Zealand, and British troops
who fought like hell and we lost over half our planes and troops
taking that island. I was not there; I was lucky because I was based
at France at the time. We lost so many good pilots and men at Crete.
We would have won the war against Russia if we had saved those planes
and men.

James: Speaking of Russia, tell me about Stalingrad.
Anna: For many years I could not talk about it, it was too terrible.
Goering who had promised Hitler that he could re-supply Stalingrad
from the air had no idea what he was talking about. Von Pailis and the
6th Army should have been ordered to fight their way out. But Hitler
agreed to airlift when Paulus agreed to stay, that victory was near.

The Junkers Ju-52/3m flew 95% of all the missions into Stalingrad.
Other planes also flew in this massive airlift, but the Junkers was
the workhorse. The nightmare was crashing into Stalingrad itself. If
you were captured by the Russians, they brutally tortured you before
they would kill you. At Stalingrad we had over 7,000 women working in
the German Army that Hitler wanted flown out because what the Russians
would do to them.

At Stalingrad we had over 350,000 men fighting the communist hoardes,
but it was not enough. We Didn’t have enough fuel, fighters, trained
mechanics, and even decent runways to work with. I usually flew out of
Tatsinskaya with food and supplies loaded aboard. I also carried three
gunners, two in the waist position and one on top. At Stalingrad
Russian Yaks were everywhere and our losses were grim.
The Russian Yak was very similar to the British Spitfire, very
maneuverable and fast. If they came out of the sun and caught you by
surprise, it was all over. However, many Russian pilots made the
mistake of approaching slowly from behind and that is when my young
men would shoot them down.

Once I heard of a gunner who ran out of ammunition, and in desperation
threw toilet paper at the Russian Yak, and the Russian was frightened
away by it!! The Russians did not know what toilet paper was, so this
pilot probably thought the gunner was throwing a bomb at him. This
trick worked many times.

James: What were the casualties at Stalingrad?
Anna: We lost 800 Ju-52 trimotors at Stalingrad, so many great superb
pilots we lost. Germany never recovered from these losses. Hitler
should have resigned and the High Command surrender to the Americans
and British. I only survived through luck and determination not to be
captured by the Russians. It is easy to be brave with two engines on
fire when the alternative is to be captured by the Russians.

James: Is there anything you would like to say to the young people
today?
Anna: Yes, flying is a great adventure, it is a joy that is boundless,
but try to do your flying when people are not trying to shoot you
down. Flying into Stalingrad was not fun, but we had to do it, we
could not let so many young men die. The future will be better for
everyone if we could be at peace and flying could be enjoyed for what
it is, the most fun that you can have!! The memories of flying the
Alps in a Junkers Ju-52/3m will be with me forever!!

Rob
Dan
2010-05-09 04:25:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rob Arndt
FLYING THE JUNKERS 52/3m at STALINGRAD
By Jim Newsom
The following is an interview with Anna Kresiling - The White Wolf of
the Luftwaffe- of what it was like to fly the Junkers Ju-52/3m
trimotor in World War II.
James: How many Lady pilots flew with the Luftwaffe in World War II?
Anna: At the beginning of the war there were 50 pilots that flew
transport aircraft, and there were many more who trained our young
fledgling pilots, but both Hitler and Goering were against women
flying fighters and bombers in combat. In Russia there were many women
that flew fighters and bombers for Stalin.
James: I have flown in the Ford Trimotor, The Junkers Ju-52/3m has
always been one of my favorite airplanes, what was it like to fly?
Anna: The Junkers was an amazing and beautiful aircraft to fly! At
Stalingrad sometimes I made take-offs with only two engines running.
If you had only one engine running you could maintain altitude.
Visability was wonderful, but the Junkers was a complex aircraft and
you needed a great instructor if you wanted to learn quickly how to
fly the trimotor.
James: You mentioned STALINGRAD, was that the nightmare we read so
much about in history books?
Anna: Stalingrad was a living hell, but what happened at Crete was far
worse. For our airborne assault on Crete we had over 450 Junkers Ju-52
trimotors filled with paratroopers. We were told that we would not
encounter ack ack flak, and taking the island would be easy. However,
the island was filled with Australian, New Zealand, and British troops
who fought like hell and we lost over half our planes and troops
taking that island. I was not there; I was lucky because I was based
at France at the time. We lost so many good pilots and men at Crete.
We would have won the war against Russia if we had saved those planes
and men.
James: Speaking of Russia, tell me about Stalingrad.
Anna: For many years I could not talk about it, it was too terrible.
Goering who had promised Hitler that he could re-supply Stalingrad
from the air had no idea what he was talking about. Von Pailis and the
6th Army should have been ordered to fight their way out. But Hitler
agreed to airlift when Paulus agreed to stay, that victory was near.
The Junkers Ju-52/3m flew 95% of all the missions into Stalingrad.
Other planes also flew in this massive airlift, but the Junkers was
the workhorse. The nightmare was crashing into Stalingrad itself. If
you were captured by the Russians, they brutally tortured you before
they would kill you. At Stalingrad we had over 7,000 women working in
the German Army that Hitler wanted flown out because what the Russians
would do to them.
At Stalingrad we had over 350,000 men fighting the communist hoardes,
but it was not enough. We Didn’t have enough fuel, fighters, trained
mechanics, and even decent runways to work with. I usually flew out of
Tatsinskaya with food and supplies loaded aboard. I also carried three
gunners, two in the waist position and one on top. At Stalingrad
Russian Yaks were everywhere and our losses were grim.
The Russian Yak was very similar to the British Spitfire, very
maneuverable and fast. If they came out of the sun and caught you by
surprise, it was all over. However, many Russian pilots made the
mistake of approaching slowly from behind and that is when my young
men would shoot them down.
Once I heard of a gunner who ran out of ammunition, and in desperation
threw toilet paper at the Russian Yak, and the Russian was frightened
away by it!! The Russians did not know what toilet paper was, so this
pilot probably thought the gunner was throwing a bomb at him. This
trick worked many times.
James: What were the casualties at Stalingrad?
Anna: We lost 800 Ju-52 trimotors at Stalingrad, so many great superb
pilots we lost. Germany never recovered from these losses. Hitler
should have resigned and the High Command surrender to the Americans
and British. I only survived through luck and determination not to be
captured by the Russians. It is easy to be brave with two engines on
fire when the alternative is to be captured by the Russians.
James: Is there anything you would like to say to the young people
today?
Anna: Yes, flying is a great adventure, it is a joy that is boundless,
but try to do your flying when people are not trying to shoot you
down. Flying into Stalingrad was not fun, but we had to do it, we
could not let so many young men die. The future will be better for
everyone if we could be at peace and flying could be enjoyed for what
it is, the most fun that you can have!! The memories of flying the
Alps in a Junkers Ju-52/3m will be with me forever!!
Rob
What a load of horse manure.

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
Rob Arndt
2010-05-09 07:03:14 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Rob Arndt
FLYING THE JUNKERS 52/3m at STALINGRAD
By Jim Newsom
The following is an interview with Anna Kresiling - The White Wolf of
the Luftwaffe- of what it was like to fly the Junkers Ju-52/3m
trimotor in World War II.
James: How many Lady pilots flew with the Luftwaffe in World War II?
Anna: At the beginning of the war there were 50 pilots that flew
transport aircraft, and there were many more who trained our young
fledgling pilots, but both Hitler and Goering were against women
flying fighters and bombers in combat. In Russia there were many women
that flew fighters and bombers for Stalin.
James: I have flown in the Ford Trimotor, The Junkers Ju-52/3m has
always been one of my favorite airplanes, what was it like to fly?
Anna: The Junkers was an amazing and beautiful aircraft to fly! At
Stalingrad sometimes I made take-offs with only two engines running.
If you had only one engine running you could maintain altitude.
Visability was wonderful, but the Junkers was a complex aircraft and
you needed a great instructor if you wanted to learn quickly how to
fly the trimotor.
James: You mentioned STALINGRAD, was that the nightmare we read so
much about in history books?
Anna: Stalingrad was a living hell, but what happened at Crete was far
worse. For our airborne assault on Crete we had over 450 Junkers Ju-52
trimotors filled with paratroopers. We were told that we would not
encounter ack ack flak, and taking the island would be easy. However,
the island was filled with Australian, New Zealand, and British troops
who fought like hell and we lost over half our planes and troops
taking that island. I was not there; I was lucky because I was based
at France at the time. We lost so many good pilots and men at Crete.
We would have won the war against Russia if we had saved those planes
and men.
James: Speaking of Russia, tell me about Stalingrad.
Anna: For many years I could not talk about it, it was too terrible.
Goering who had promised Hitler that he could re-supply Stalingrad
from the air had no idea what he was talking about. Von Pailis and the
6th Army should have been ordered to fight their way out. But Hitler
agreed to airlift when Paulus agreed to stay, that victory was near.
The Junkers Ju-52/3m flew 95% of all the missions into Stalingrad.
Other planes also flew in this massive airlift, but the Junkers was
the workhorse. The nightmare was crashing into Stalingrad itself. If
you were captured by the Russians, they brutally tortured you before
they would kill you. At Stalingrad we had over 7,000 women working in
the German Army that Hitler wanted flown out because what the Russians
would do to them.
At Stalingrad we had over 350,000 men fighting the communist hoardes,
but it was not enough. We Didn’t have enough fuel, fighters, trained
mechanics, and even decent runways to work with. I usually flew out of
Tatsinskaya with food and supplies loaded aboard. I also carried three
gunners, two in the waist position and one on top. At Stalingrad
Russian Yaks were everywhere and our losses were grim.
The Russian Yak was very similar to the British Spitfire, very
maneuverable and fast. If they came out of the sun and caught you by
surprise, it was all over. However, many Russian pilots made the
mistake of approaching slowly from behind and that is when my young
men would shoot them down.
Once I heard of a gunner who ran out of ammunition, and in desperation
threw toilet paper at the Russian Yak, and the Russian was frightened
away by it!! The Russians did not know what toilet paper was, so this
pilot probably thought the gunner was throwing a bomb at him. This
trick worked many times.
James: What were the casualties at Stalingrad?
Anna: We lost 800 Ju-52 trimotors at Stalingrad, so many great superb
pilots we lost. Germany never recovered from these losses. Hitler
should have resigned and the High Command surrender to the Americans
and British. I only survived through luck and determination not to be
captured by the Russians. It is easy to be brave with two engines on
fire when the alternative is to be captured by the Russians.
James: Is there anything you would like to say to the young people
today?
Anna: Yes, flying is a great adventure, it is a joy that is boundless,
but try to do your flying when people are not trying to shoot you
down. Flying into Stalingrad was not fun, but we had to do it, we
could not let so many young men die. The future will be better for
everyone if we could be at peace and flying could be enjoyed for what
it is, the most fun that you can have!! The memories of flying the
Alps in a Junkers Ju-52/3m will be with me forever!!
Rob
    What a load of horse manure.
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
What's your problem? Another Nazi female pilot better than you?

Anna Kreisling was born on Jan 10, 1920 in Berlin, Germany. In 1944
she reached the rank of Flugkapitan and was awarded the Iron Cross
with diamonds, presented by Hermann Goering. She was also awarded the
War Merit Cross.

Rob
Dan
2010-05-09 11:30:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rob Arndt
Post by Dan
Post by Rob Arndt
FLYING THE JUNKERS 52/3m at STALINGRAD
By Jim Newsom
The following is an interview with Anna Kresiling - The White Wolf of
the Luftwaffe- of what it was like to fly the Junkers Ju-52/3m
trimotor in World War II.
James: How many Lady pilots flew with the Luftwaffe in World War II?
Anna: At the beginning of the war there were 50 pilots that flew
transport aircraft, and there were many more who trained our young
fledgling pilots, but both Hitler and Goering were against women
flying fighters and bombers in combat. In Russia there were many women
that flew fighters and bombers for Stalin.
James: I have flown in the Ford Trimotor, The Junkers Ju-52/3m has
always been one of my favorite airplanes, what was it like to fly?
Anna: The Junkers was an amazing and beautiful aircraft to fly! At
Stalingrad sometimes I made take-offs with only two engines running.
If you had only one engine running you could maintain altitude.
Visability was wonderful, but the Junkers was a complex aircraft and
you needed a great instructor if you wanted to learn quickly how to
fly the trimotor.
James: You mentioned STALINGRAD, was that the nightmare we read so
much about in history books?
Anna: Stalingrad was a living hell, but what happened at Crete was far
worse. For our airborne assault on Crete we had over 450 Junkers Ju-52
trimotors filled with paratroopers. We were told that we would not
encounter ack ack flak, and taking the island would be easy. However,
the island was filled with Australian, New Zealand, and British troops
who fought like hell and we lost over half our planes and troops
taking that island. I was not there; I was lucky because I was based
at France at the time. We lost so many good pilots and men at Crete.
We would have won the war against Russia if we had saved those planes
and men.
James: Speaking of Russia, tell me about Stalingrad.
Anna: For many years I could not talk about it, it was too terrible.
Goering who had promised Hitler that he could re-supply Stalingrad
from the air had no idea what he was talking about. Von Pailis and the
6th Army should have been ordered to fight their way out. But Hitler
agreed to airlift when Paulus agreed to stay, that victory was near.
The Junkers Ju-52/3m flew 95% of all the missions into Stalingrad.
Other planes also flew in this massive airlift, but the Junkers was
the workhorse. The nightmare was crashing into Stalingrad itself. If
you were captured by the Russians, they brutally tortured you before
they would kill you. At Stalingrad we had over 7,000 women working in
the German Army that Hitler wanted flown out because what the Russians
would do to them.
At Stalingrad we had over 350,000 men fighting the communist hoardes,
but it was not enough. We Didn’t have enough fuel, fighters, trained
mechanics, and even decent runways to work with. I usually flew out of
Tatsinskaya with food and supplies loaded aboard. I also carried three
gunners, two in the waist position and one on top. At Stalingrad
Russian Yaks were everywhere and our losses were grim.
The Russian Yak was very similar to the British Spitfire, very
maneuverable and fast. If they came out of the sun and caught you by
surprise, it was all over. However, many Russian pilots made the
mistake of approaching slowly from behind and that is when my young
men would shoot them down.
Once I heard of a gunner who ran out of ammunition, and in desperation
threw toilet paper at the Russian Yak, and the Russian was frightened
away by it!! The Russians did not know what toilet paper was, so this
pilot probably thought the gunner was throwing a bomb at him. This
trick worked many times.
James: What were the casualties at Stalingrad?
Anna: We lost 800 Ju-52 trimotors at Stalingrad, so many great superb
pilots we lost. Germany never recovered from these losses. Hitler
should have resigned and the High Command surrender to the Americans
and British. I only survived through luck and determination not to be
captured by the Russians. It is easy to be brave with two engines on
fire when the alternative is to be captured by the Russians.
James: Is there anything you would like to say to the young people
today?
Anna: Yes, flying is a great adventure, it is a joy that is boundless,
but try to do your flying when people are not trying to shoot you
down. Flying into Stalingrad was not fun, but we had to do it, we
could not let so many young men die. The future will be better for
everyone if we could be at peace and flying could be enjoyed for what
it is, the most fun that you can have!! The memories of flying the
Alps in a Junkers Ju-52/3m will be with me forever!!
Rob
What a load of horse manure.
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
What's your problem? Another Nazi female pilot better than you?
Anna Kreisling was born on Jan 10, 1920 in Berlin, Germany. In 1944
she reached the rank of Flugkapitan and was awarded the Iron Cross
with diamonds, presented by Hermann Goering. She was also awarded the
War Merit Cross.
Rob
The story isn't all the believable when it includes Soviets
frightened by a roll of toilet paper.

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
Keith Willshaw
2010-05-09 12:32:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rob Arndt
Anna Kreisling was born on Jan 10, 1920 in Berlin, Germany. In 1944
she reached the rank of Flugkapitan and was awarded the Iron Cross
with diamonds, presented by Hermann Goering. She was also awarded the
War Merit Cross.
Rob
The story isn't all the believable when it includes Soviets frightened
by a roll of toilet paper.
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
Note that not a scrap of evidence beyond a hand transcribed magazine
article has been presented for ANY of this . Now given that the Germans
kept meticulous records and that many German pilots are not only on record
but have written their memoirs this raises a big red flag with the word
'bullshit' written across it.

Keith
Rob Arndt
2010-05-09 16:09:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On May 9, 5:32�am, "Keith Willshaw"
Post by Keith Willshaw
Post by Rob Arndt
Anna Kreisling was born on Jan 10, 1920 in Berlin, Germany. In 1944
she reached the rank of Flugkapitan and was awarded the Iron Cross
with diamonds, presented by Hermann Goering. She was also awarded the
War Merit Cross.
Rob
� The story isn't all the believable when it includes Soviets frightened
by a roll of toilet paper.
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
Note that not a scrap of evidence beyond a hand transcribed magazine
article has been presented for ANY of this . Now given that the Germans
kept meticulous records and that many German pilots are not only on record
but have written their memoirs this raises a big red flag with the word
'bullshit' written across it.
Keith
Well, let's see:

1) In the Leni Reifenstahl film "Olympia" Anna Kreisling is to
Hitler's left in a shot of them watching the games. Hitler is with Eva
to his right with Himmler to his left and then Anna. So she is a real
person.

2) Anna married her husband in 1955 and has been introduced to several
US Presidents including Bill Clinton and yet it is impossible to find
pics of her anywhere. Her neighbors and friends have also reminded
people of her DC-3 at Reno and yet no photos come up again. I find it
highly suspicious that this woman's life is covered-up to the extent
that there is no visual proof of her except for Olympia and also the
Pacific Flyer interview.

3) When she was interviewed in 2001 she was 81 years old and still
very beautiful. By now she would be 90 years old. But the information
blackout is so strong that I have found no evidence that she has died,
nor what of her husband. It is way beyond normal.

4) German records were deliberately destroyed from March-May 1945 and
particularly those of the SS and KG 200, for whom she worked and also
knew of their operations with smuggling Nazis out of Germany to S
America and other destinations. That information plus her role in
spying on the US and making deals made her invaluable to the US Intel
teams and also to the USSR as Stalin wanted to know about Hitler and
other Nazis and why the US was making deals with the Nazis for
technologies. Since she flew the Ju-390, which is absolutely believed
to be the a/c that Kammler used to remove the Bell Device from Silesia
to Norway and then to S America or the US, she becomes vital. The US
protected Anna and moved her to America, destroying her OSS/CIA
records postwar and if she is just an ordinary person she should be
able to be located using FOIA. I'm willing to bet no access.

5) The Ju-390 at Area 51 is not new- many claims have been made of
German a/c there postwar including that giant. If so, it is most
likely the one that Kammler used to transport the Bell Device which
would be in US hands.

6) Ju-390 history is not well-documented. With the V1 destroyed that
only officially leaves the V2 and incomplete V3 and no A-series. But
with another a/c in Norway on stand-by and another in Prague on standy-
by plus up to 3 Ju-390s operated by KG 200= at least 5 more built in
secrecy which would add up to 7 built and one incomplete. The Germans
also sent the plans for the Ju-390A series to Japan as bomber, but the
Japanese had no time to start any production. Speer claims a polar
route was used for one of those trips east and others that KG 200
disguised them in Lufthansa markings to cross over to fields held by
the Japanese in China for exchanges of technology for raw materials.
No way with just one a/c operating. And the US flight(s) are still
controversial. There would be no reason to make up this feat as a
Bv-222 at sea could refuel from a U-boat and make that trip a lot more
easier. But it is still there and yet not as hotly contested anymore
since there is more info connecting KG 200 with such flights, Kammler
and the Bell Device, and Anna Kreisling also.

I would also remind you Keith that Britain got a hell of a lot of
secret SS weapons and to my knowledge hasn't shared the bulk of what
was found from their side. Just one train load in 1945 was several
miles long and nothing is stated about what it contained that was so
important. I think Britain got a lot of advanced components and
documents and yet with their inferior scientific postwar research
failed to capitalize on any of the German tech except maybe for
military a/c. They failed with the rocket technology and missile
categories always lagging behind the US and even USSR. Yet the BIOS
Reports are huge in categories of weapons and documents captured on
almost every type. That must be embarrassing.

Rob
JasiekS
2010-05-09 17:03:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rob Arndt
Just one train load in 1945 was several
miles long and nothing is stated about what it contained that was so
important. I think Britain got a lot of advanced components and
documents and yet with their inferior scientific postwar research
failed to capitalize on any of the German tech except maybe for
military a/c. They failed with the rocket technology and missile
categories always lagging behind the US and even USSR. Yet the
BIOS
Reports are huge in categories of weapons and documents captured on
almost every type. That must be embarrassing.
When I was young boy my second object of interest were locomotives.
I admired especially German e-loks nicknamed 'Deutsches Krokodil'
(model E 94) and 'SBB-Krokodil' (SBB Ce 6/8 II). So, tell me Rob -
how many and what locomotives were moving a train 'several miles
long'? Were they e-loks or steam engines?
--
JasiekS
Warsaw, Poland
Rob Arndt
2010-05-09 17:42:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JasiekS
Post by Rob Arndt
Just one train load in 1945 was several
miles long and nothing is stated about what it contained that was so
important. I think Britain got a lot of advanced components and
documents and yet with their inferior scientific postwar research
failed to capitalize on any of the German tech except maybe for
military a/c. They failed with the rocket technology and missile
categories always lagging behind the US and even USSR. Yet the BIOS
Reports are huge in categories of weapons and documents captured on
almost every type. That must be embarrassing.
When I was young boy my second object of interest were locomotives.
I admired especially German e-loks nicknamed 'Deutsches Krokodil'
(model E 94) and 'SBB-Krokodil' (SBB Ce 6/8 II). So, tell me Rob -
how many and what locomotives were moving a train 'several miles
long'? Were they e-loks or steam engines?
--
JasiekS
Warsaw, Poland
At the end of WWII, three weeks before the U.S. went to Peenemunde to
nab the V-2s and the scientists, including Werner Von Braun, the Brits
went into the underground redoubts of the Nazis in Austria, the Black
Forest and Thuringia. The results were THREE top secret trains, one of
them 8 miles long (that one train alone was 655 box cars and flat
cars). The Brits also grabbed the disk engineers, including Herr
Miethe (later traced to the employ of A.V. Roe). The trains took the
stuff, some of which was too large to fit in box cars and had to be
covered by tarpaulins on its way to the coast of Brittany (France),
there to be loaded on board ships, taken through the Panama Canal up
the coast to Vancouver, B.C., and from there by train inland to the
newly constructed surface facility of the A. V. Roe Company. 150 pre-
fab factory buildings were sent from England to the same site. By 1947
it was dug completely underground.

The US transported over 300 train loads of just V-2 technology!!! They
got 11,000 tons of documents sent to Wright Field too!!!

Rob
JasiekS
2010-05-09 17:53:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The results were THREE top secret trains, one of them
8 miles long (that one train alone was 655 box cars and flat
cars).
I asked about number and type of locomotives. Standard cargo
locomotive moves something like 20-30 cars nowadays. Passenger ones
are restricted to 12 cars in Poland.
--
JasiekS
Warsaw, Poland
Keith Willshaw
2010-05-09 18:36:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The results were THREE top secret trains, one of them
8 miles long (that one train alone was 655 box cars and flat cars).
I asked about number and type of locomotives. Standard cargo locomotive
moves something like 20-30 cars nowadays. Passenger ones are restricted to
12 cars in Poland.
--
JasiekS
Warsaw, Poland
As I am sure you understand the notion of moving such trains on
European railways post war is ludicrous. One of the longest trains
ever hauled was in Ohio where a train consisting of 500 coal
cars was hauled by 3 x 3600 HP diesels at the head with another 3
in the middle.

The world record was set by an iron ore train in Australia that was 7.35 km
long that was hauled by 8 diesel/electric. The longest train commonly
hauled in WW2 Europe was around 50 cars as I recall.

About the most powerful locomotives in post war Europe were the US
supplied S-160 2-8-0 freight haulers that had a max tractive effort
(aka drawbar pull) of around 30,000 lbs

In comparison the massive DE locos to haul the monster freight
trains you see in the USA and Australia can apply a tractive effort of more
than 120,000 lbs. The simple fact is that DE locomotives can apply
much more controllable power than any steam loco.

Keith
JasiekS
2010-05-09 20:29:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Keith Willshaw
As I am sure you understand the notion of moving such trains on
European railways post war is ludicrous. One of the longest trains
ever hauled was in Ohio where a train consisting of 500 coal
cars was hauled by 3 x 3600 HP diesels at the head with another 3
in the middle.
I expected something like this with double locos in the head, tail
and in the middle. BTW synchronising such a combo woldn't be
trivial.
Post by Keith Willshaw
The world record was set by an iron ore train in Australia that was 7.35 km
long that was hauled by 8 diesel/electric. The longest train
commonly
hauled in WW2 Europe was around 50 cars as I recall.
I am well aware about this. I think it would be much easier to haul
such load divided.
Post by Keith Willshaw
About the most powerful locomotives in post war Europe were the US
supplied S-160 2-8-0 freight haulers that had a max tractive
effort
(aka drawbar pull) of around 30,000 lbs
In comparison the massive DE locos to haul the monster freight
trains you see in the USA and Australia can apply a tractive
effort of more
than 120,000 lbs. The simple fact is that DE locomotives can apply
much more controllable power than any steam loco.
Thanks.
--
JasiekS
Warsaw, Poland
Gordon
2010-05-09 18:15:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rob Arndt
At the end of WWII, three weeks before the U.S. went to Peenemunde to
nab the V-2s and the scientists, including Werner Von Braun, the Brits
went into the underground redoubts of the Nazis in Austria, the Black
Forest and Thuringia.
The US Army went to Peenemunde (really..?) after von Braun surrendered
in the Bavarian Alps, far away from the Baltic Sea rocket facility.
The Soviets (not US troops) that overran Peenemunde reported that over
75% of the structures and machinery were "completely destroyed".
Following the last US heavy bomber strike on the base, everything
usable was removed and dispersed, leaving Peenemunde a smoldering
ruin. What do you think the US army got when it 'went to
Peenemunde'? From what I have read, the Allies recovered no V-2s from
there; they got them from tansport trains and at the Mittelwerk
factory. We didn't go there (Peenemunde) - von Braun fled into the
arms of our forces, it wasn't us dashing to go capture him.

Gordon
David E. Powell
2010-05-10 15:50:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gordon
Post by Rob Arndt
At the end of WWII, three weeks before the U.S. went to Peenemunde to
nab the V-2s and the scientists, including Werner Von Braun, the Brits
went into the underground redoubts of the Nazis in Austria, the Black
Forest and Thuringia.
The US Army went to Peenemunde (really..?) after von Braun surrendered
in the Bavarian Alps, far away from the Baltic Sea rocket facility.
The Soviets (not US troops) that overran Peenemunde reported that over
75% of the structures and machinery were "completely destroyed".
Following the last US heavy bomber strike on the base, everything
usable was removed and dispersed, leaving Peenemunde a smoldering
ruin.  What do you think the US army got when it 'went to
Peenemunde'?  From what I have read, the Allies recovered no V-2s from
there; they got them from tansport trains and at the Mittelwerk
factory.  We didn't go there (Peenemunde) - von Braun fled into the
arms of our forces, it wasn't us dashing to go capture him.
Gordon
VB also was key because he led the US and scientists to each other,
several times. He convinced many to go to the US instead of staying in
Europe. None of them wanted to be anywhere near the Soviets.
Alistair Gunn
2010-05-10 10:26:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JasiekS
When I was young boy my second object of interest were locomotives.
I admired especially German e-loks nicknamed 'Deutsches Krokodil'
(model E 94) and 'SBB-Krokodil' (SBB Ce 6/8 II). So, tell me Rob -
how many and what locomotives were moving a train 'several miles
long'? Were they e-loks or steam engines?
Whilst there's obviously the option of "whatever we've got around here
that still steams" in 1945, if you're the Allies wanting to haul long
heavy trains then it's likely that the engine(s) at the front would be
either War Department Austerity 2-8-0s, 2-10-0s or a US S160.

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD_Austerity_2-8-0>
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD_Austerity_2-10-0>
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S160>
--
These opinions might not even be mine ...
Let alone connected with my employer ...
Dan
2010-05-10 10:58:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Alistair Gunn
Post by JasiekS
When I was young boy my second object of interest were locomotives.
I admired especially German e-loks nicknamed 'Deutsches Krokodil'
(model E 94) and 'SBB-Krokodil' (SBB Ce 6/8 II). So, tell me Rob -
how many and what locomotives were moving a train 'several miles
long'? Were they e-loks or steam engines?
Whilst there's obviously the option of "whatever we've got around here
that still steams" in 1945, if you're the Allies wanting to haul long
heavy trains then it's likely that the engine(s) at the front would be
either War Department Austerity 2-8-0s, 2-10-0s or a US S160.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD_Austerity_2-8-0>
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD_Austerity_2-10-0>
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S160>
The fun part would be getting the locomotives to where they were
needed over a rail system that was in shambles. The only lines being
repaired and used were those the occupiers needed immediately. Add that
to finding serviceable rolling stock and you have your basic Chinese
ceremonial goose stuffing.

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
Alistair Gunn
2010-05-10 15:16:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan
The fun part would be getting the locomotives to where they were
needed over a rail system that was in shambles. The only lines being
repaired and used were those the occupiers needed immediately. Add that
to finding serviceable rolling stock and you have your basic Chinese
ceremonial goose stuffing.
True, and noone would've wanted a train "several miles long" messing up
the timetable by it's mere existence! "Several miles" would be longer
than the available loops and/or refuge sidings[1] meaning no other train
could overtake it, and since such a long heavy train would crawl up every
hill lots of other trains would want want to! Cue some very annoyed
railway aministrators!

[1] And I wouldn't bet on their being many functional examples of either
in the rail network of continental Europe in 1945 either.
--
These opinions might not even be mine ...
Let alone connected with my employer ...
Dan
2010-05-10 16:10:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Alistair Gunn
Post by Dan
The fun part would be getting the locomotives to where they were
needed over a rail system that was in shambles. The only lines being
repaired and used were those the occupiers needed immediately. Add that
to finding serviceable rolling stock and you have your basic Chinese
ceremonial goose stuffing.
True, and noone would've wanted a train "several miles long" messing up
the timetable by it's mere existence! "Several miles" would be longer
than the available loops and/or refuge sidings[1] meaning no other train
could overtake it, and since such a long heavy train would crawl up every
hill lots of other trains would want want to! Cue some very annoyed
railway aministrators!
In any event such a thing would have attracted so much attention it
would have been common knowledge and I'm sure someone would have
photographed it. The term "subtle" wouldn't come to mind.

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
Keith Willshaw
2010-05-09 17:36:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rob Arndt
On May 9, 5:32�am, "Keith Willshaw"
Post by Keith Willshaw
Post by Rob Arndt
Anna Kreisling was born on Jan 10, 1920 in Berlin, Germany. In 1944
she reached the rank of Flugkapitan and was awarded the Iron Cross
with diamonds, presented by Hermann Goering. She was also awarded the
War Merit Cross.
Rob
� The story isn't all the believable when it includes Soviets frightened
by a roll of toilet paper.
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
Note that not a scrap of evidence beyond a hand transcribed magazine
article has been presented for ANY of this . Now given that the Germans
kept meticulous records and that many German pilots are not only on record
but have written their memoirs this raises a big red flag with the word
'bullshit' written across it.
Keith
1) In the Leni Reifenstahl film "Olympia" Anna Kreisling is to
Hitler's left in a shot of them watching the games. Hitler is with Eva
to his right with Himmler to his left and then Anna. So she is a real
person.
Which proves that A woman who's identity is NOT made clear in the film
went to the Olympic games in 1936. It proves NOTHING with regards to
the claims being made.
Post by Rob Arndt
2) Anna married her life is covered-up to the extent
that there is no visual proof of her except for Olympia and also the
Pacific Flyer interview.
So your proof is that their is no proof, we have been here before
Post by Rob Arndt
3) When she was interviewed in 2001 she was 81 years old and still
very beautiful. By now she would be 90 years old. But the information
blackout is so strong that I have found no evidence that she has died,
nor what of her husband. It is way beyond normal.
More lack of information as proof - I see.
Post by Rob Arndt
4) German records were deliberately destroyed from March-May 1945 and
particularly those of the SS and KG 200, for whom she worked and also
knew of their operations with smuggling Nazis out of Germany to S
America and other destinations. That information plus her role in
spying on the US and making deals made her invaluable to the US Intel
teams and also to the USSR as Stalin wanted to know about Hitler and
other Nazis and why the US was making deals with the Nazis for
technologies. Since she flew the Ju-390, which is absolutely believed
to be the a/c that Kammler used to remove the Bell Device from Silesia
to Norway and then to S America or the US, she becomes vital. The US
protected Anna and moved her to America, destroying her OSS/CIA
records postwar and if she is just an ordinary person she should be
able to be located using FOIA. I'm willing to bet no access.
Pure fiction put forward as evidence
Post by Rob Arndt
5) The Ju-390 at Area 51 is not new- many claims have been made of
German a/c there postwar including that giant. If so, it is most
likely the one that Kammler used to transport the Bell Device which
would be in US hands.
Followed by UFO loony make believe.
Post by Rob Arndt
6) Ju-390 history is not well-documented. With the V1 destroyed that
only officially leaves the V2 and incomplete V3 and no A-series. But
with another a/c in Norway on stand-by and another in Prague on standy-
by plus up to 3 Ju-390s operated by KG 200= at least 5 more built in
secrecy which would add up to 7 built and one incomplete. The Germans
also sent the plans for the Ju-390A series to Japan as bomber, but the
Japanese had no time to start any production. Speer claims a polar
route was used for one of those trips east and others that KG 200
disguised them in Lufthansa markings to cross over to fields held by
the Japanese in China for exchanges of technology for raw materials.
No way with just one a/c operating. And the US flight(s) are still
controversial. There would be no reason to make up this feat as a
Bv-222 at sea could refuel from a U-boat and make that trip a lot more
easier. But it is still there and yet not as hotly contested anymore
since there is more info connecting KG 200 with such flights, Kammler
and the Bell Device, and Anna Kreisling also.
No evidence here then.
Post by Rob Arndt
I would also remind you Keith that Britain got a hell of a lot of
secret SS weapons and to my knowledge hasn't shared the bulk of what
was found from their side. Just one train load in 1945 was several
miles long
This is just plain silly given that state of the continental railways in
1945 nobody was hauling trains several miles long
Post by Rob Arndt
and nothing is stated about what it contained that was so
important. I think Britain got a lot of advanced components and
documents and yet with their inferior scientific postwar research
failed to capitalize on any of the German tech except maybe for
military a/c. They failed with the rocket technology and missile
categories always lagging behind the US and even USSR. Yet the BIOS
Reports are huge in categories of weapons and documents captured on
almost every type. That must be embarrassing.
Rob
So you have no evidence at all in fact, not one jot.

Keith
Michele
2010-05-10 10:38:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Keith Willshaw
So you have no evidence at all in fact, not one jot.
What I find surprising is that one can write so long without actually
providing anything substantial. Maybe we could use that famous razor and
conclude that if nearly nothing is documented about this woman, she wasn't
all that important at the time to start with?
Jim Wilkins
2010-05-10 11:08:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michele
Post by Keith Willshaw
So you have no evidence at all in fact, not one jot.
What I find surprising is that one can write so long without actually
providing anything substantial. Maybe we could use that famous razor and
conclude that if nearly nothing is documented about this woman, she wasn't
all that important at the time to start with?
Do you know rock, paper, scissors? The rocks in a conspiracy theorists
head dull Occam's Razor, the paper hides a coverup. They right no
matter what.

jsw
Michele
2010-05-12 09:16:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michele
Post by Keith Willshaw
So you have no evidence at all in fact, not one jot.
What I find surprising is that one can write so long without actually
providing anything substantial. Maybe we could use that famous razor and
conclude that if nearly nothing is documented about this woman, she wasn't
all that important at the time to start with?
Do you know rock, paper, scissors? The rocks in a conspiracy theorists
head dull Occam's Razor, the paper hides a coverup. They right no
matter what.
Nicely put, you made me smile, thanks.
j***@gmail.com
2019-10-18 01:00:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Lice
j***@gmail.com
2019-10-18 01:01:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Lice

tomcervo
2010-05-10 00:31:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rob Arndt
3) When she was interviewed in 2001 she was 81 years old and still
very beautiful. By now she would be 90 years old. But the information
blackout is so strong that I have found no evidence that she has died,
nor what of her husband.
I think she was married to Corn Sherrill.
Dan
2010-05-09 21:35:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Keith Willshaw
Post by Dan
Post by Rob Arndt
Anna Kreisling was born on Jan 10, 1920 in Berlin, Germany. In 1944
she reached the rank of Flugkapitan and was awarded the Iron Cross
with diamonds, presented by Hermann Goering. She was also awarded the
War Merit Cross.
Rob
The story isn't all the believable when it includes Soviets
frightened by a roll of toilet paper.
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
Note that not a scrap of evidence beyond a hand transcribed magazine
article has been presented for ANY of this . Now given that the Germans
kept meticulous records and that many German pilots are not only on record
but have written their memoirs this raises a big red flag with the word
'bullshit' written across it.
Keith
There have been "I was there a long time ago" war stories since the
dawn of time. It is common world wide. It's easy to do when one finds a
gullible audience or there is no way to verify the facts. In this case
aren't is a gullible audience AND is unable, or unwilling, to verify the
facts.

Now, this is the honest to God truth, back in 1943 I was there....

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
David E. Powell
2010-05-09 16:48:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rob Arndt
Post by Rob Arndt
FLYING THE JUNKERS 52/3m at STALINGRAD
By Jim Newsom
The following is an interview with Anna Kresiling - The White Wolf of
the Luftwaffe- of what it was like to fly the Junkers Ju-52/3m
trimotor in World War II.
James: How many Lady pilots flew with the Luftwaffe in World War II?
Anna: At the beginning of the war there were 50 pilots that flew
transport aircraft, and there were many more who trained our young
fledgling pilots, but both Hitler and Goering were against women
flying fighters and bombers in combat. In Russia there were many women
that flew fighters and bombers for Stalin.
James: I have flown in the Ford Trimotor, The Junkers Ju-52/3m has
always been one of my favorite airplanes, what was it like to fly?
Anna: The Junkers was an amazing and beautiful aircraft to fly! At
Stalingrad sometimes I made take-offs with only two engines running.
If you had only one engine running you could maintain altitude.
Visability was wonderful, but the Junkers was a complex aircraft and
you needed a great instructor if you wanted to learn quickly how to
fly the trimotor.
James: You mentioned STALINGRAD, was that the nightmare we read so
much about in history books?
Anna: Stalingrad was a living hell, but what happened at Crete was far
worse. For our airborne assault on Crete we had over 450 Junkers Ju-52
trimotors filled with paratroopers. We were told that we would not
encounter ack ack flak, and taking the island would be easy. However,
the island was filled with Australian, New Zealand, and British troops
who fought like hell and we lost over half our planes and troops
taking that island. I was not there; I was lucky because I was based
at France at the time. We lost so many good pilots and men at Crete.
We would have won the war against Russia if we had saved those planes
and men.
James: Speaking of Russia, tell me about Stalingrad.
Anna: For many years I could not talk about it, it was too terrible.
Goering who had promised Hitler that he could re-supply Stalingrad
from the air had no idea what he was talking about. Von Pailis and the
6th Army should have been ordered to fight their way out. But Hitler
agreed to airlift when Paulus agreed to stay, that victory was near.
The Junkers Ju-52/3m flew 95% of all the missions into Stalingrad.
Other planes also flew in this massive airlift, but the Junkers was
the workhorse. The nightmare was crashing into Stalingrad itself. If
you were captured by the Russians, they brutally tortured you before
they would kill you. At Stalingrad we had over 7,000 women working in
the German Army that Hitler wanted flown out because what the Russians
would do to them.
At Stalingrad we had over 350,000 men fighting the communist hoardes,
but it was not enough. We Didn’t have enough fuel, fighters, trained
mechanics, and even decent runways to work with. I usually flew out of
Tatsinskaya with food and supplies loaded aboard. I also carried three
gunners, two in the waist position and one on top. At Stalingrad
Russian Yaks were everywhere and our losses were grim.
The Russian Yak was very similar to the British Spitfire, very
maneuverable and fast. If they came out of the sun and caught you by
surprise, it was all over. However, many Russian pilots made the
mistake of approaching slowly from behind and that is when my young
men would shoot them down.
Once I heard of a gunner who ran out of ammunition, and in desperation
threw toilet paper at the Russian Yak, and the Russian was frightened
away by it!! The Russians did not know what toilet paper was, so this
pilot probably thought the gunner was throwing a bomb at him. This
trick worked many times.
James: What were the casualties at Stalingrad?
Anna: We lost 800 Ju-52 trimotors at Stalingrad, so many great superb
pilots we lost. Germany never recovered from these losses. Hitler
should have resigned and the High Command surrender to the Americans
and British. I only survived through luck and determination not to be
captured by the Russians. It is easy to be brave with two engines on
fire when the alternative is to be captured by the Russians.
James: Is there anything you would like to say to the young people
today?
Anna: Yes, flying is a great adventure, it is a joy that is boundless,
but try to do your flying when people are not trying to shoot you
down. Flying into Stalingrad was not fun, but we had to do it, we
could not let so many young men die. The future will be better for
everyone if we could be at peace and flying could be enjoyed for what
it is, the most fun that you can have!! The memories of flying the
Alps in a Junkers Ju-52/3m will be with me forever!!
Rob
    What a load of horse manure.
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
What's your problem? Another Nazi female pilot better than you?
Anna Kreisling was born on Jan 10, 1920 in Berlin, Germany. In 1944
she reached the rank of Flugkapitan and was awarded the Iron Cross
with diamonds, presented by Hermann Goering. She was also awarded the
War Merit Cross.
Rob
   The story isn't all the believable when it includes Soviets
frightened by a roll of toilet paper.
Maybe they actually all dove away after it... beats waiting in line
six months!
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
Dan
2010-05-09 11:33:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Rob Arndt wrote:
<snip>
Post by Rob Arndt
What's your problem? Another Nazi female pilot better than you?
Please note unlike you I don't bash aircrew capability based on
nationality. You do it all the time which is a tad hypocritical since
the worst pilot of any nationality was better than you ever could be. At
least they trained, you never have.

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
David E. Powell
2010-05-09 04:58:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rob Arndt
FLYING THE JUNKERS 52/3m at STALINGRAD
By Jim Newsom
The following is an interview with Anna Kresiling - The White Wolf of
the Luftwaffe- of what it was like to fly the Junkers Ju-52/3m
trimotor in World War II.
James: How many Lady pilots flew with the Luftwaffe in World War II?
Anna: At the beginning of the war there were 50 pilots that flew
transport aircraft, and there were many more who trained our young
fledgling pilots, but both Hitler and Goering were against women
flying fighters and bombers in combat. In Russia there were many women
that flew fighters and bombers for Stalin.
I'd also think that women working in war industries would have been a
key difference too.
Post by Rob Arndt
James: I have flown in the Ford Trimotor, The Junkers Ju-52/3m has
always been one of my favorite airplanes, what was it like to fly?
Anna: The Junkers was an amazing and beautiful aircraft to fly! At
Stalingrad sometimes I made take-offs with only two engines running.
If you had only one engine running you could maintain altitude.
Visability was wonderful, but the Junkers was a complex aircraft and
you needed a great instructor if you wanted to learn quickly how to
fly the trimotor.
It must be nice considering how many stayed in service even years
after the war in various airlines.
Post by Rob Arndt
James: You mentioned STALINGRAD, was that the nightmare we read so
much about in history books?
Anna: Stalingrad was a living hell, but what happened at Crete was far
worse. For our airborne assault on Crete we had over 450 Junkers Ju-52
trimotors filled with paratroopers. We were told that we would not
encounter ack ack flak, and taking the island would be easy. However,
the island was filled with Australian, New Zealand, and British troops
who fought like hell and we lost over half our planes and troops
taking that island. I was not there; I was lucky because I was based
at France at the time. We lost so many good pilots and men at Crete.
We would have won the war against Russia if we had saved those planes
and men.
Maybe supplied Stalingrad better but otherwise.... well she's entitled
to her opinion. Crete costing them more planes than Stalingrad is
where she is going, as far as loss of paratroops and airmobile assets,
plus transports and trained crews, it must have been a disaster for
the Gerries.
Post by Rob Arndt
James: Speaking of Russia, tell me about Stalingrad.
Anna: For many years I could not talk about it, it was too terrible.
Goering who had promised Hitler that he could re-supply Stalingrad
from the air had no idea what he was talking about. Von Pailis and the
6th Army should have been ordered to fight their way out. But Hitler
agreed to airlift when Paulus agreed to stay, that victory was near.
Then Hitler tole Paulus he had to stay when the opposite became clear.
Hitler's early gift for overriding generals at times like the
Czechoslovakia attack in 1938 bit him here, later in the war.
Post by Rob Arndt
The Junkers Ju-52/3m flew 95% of all the missions into Stalingrad.
Other planes also flew in this massive airlift, but the Junkers was
the workhorse. The nightmare was crashing into Stalingrad itself. If
you were captured by the Russians, they brutally tortured you before
they would kill you. At Stalingrad we had over 7,000 women working in
the German Army that Hitler wanted flown out because what the Russians
would do to them.
Much like US Female personell that were evacuated from the
Phillipines....
Post by Rob Arndt
At Stalingrad we had over 350,000 men fighting the communist hoardes,
but it was not enough. We Didn’t have enough fuel, fighters, trained
mechanics, and even decent runways to work with. I usually flew out of
Tatsinskaya with food and supplies loaded aboard. I also carried three
gunners, two in the waist position and one on top. At Stalingrad
Russian Yaks were everywhere and our losses were grim.
The Russian Yak was very similar to the British Spitfire, very
maneuverable and fast. If they came out of the sun and caught you by
surprise, it was all over. However, many Russian pilots made the
mistake of approaching slowly from behind and that is when my young
men would shoot them down.
Once I heard of a gunner who ran out of ammunition, and in desperation
threw toilet paper at the Russian Yak, and the Russian was frightened
away by it!! The Russians did not know what toilet paper was, so this
pilot probably thought the gunner was throwing a bomb at him. This
trick worked many times.
James: What were the casualties at Stalingrad?
Anna: We lost 800 Ju-52 trimotors at Stalingrad, so many great superb
pilots we lost. Germany never recovered from these losses. Hitler
should have resigned and the High Command surrender to the Americans
and British.
The separate peace idea was floated several times but rejected I
believe, though Hitler was the main problem. Him resigning would have
been huge but he probably figured he'd be dead if he did - so he put
himself over his country, an error for any national leader. By June
1944, after D-Day at Normandy, even Field Marshal von Rundstedt was
telling Hitler that it was over and he should make peace immediately.
(For which he was fired.)

I only survived through luck and determination not to be
Post by Rob Arndt
captured by the Russians. It is easy to be brave with two engines on
fire when the alternative is to be captured by the Russians.
I hear that, similar to U.S. fliers who glided home to Henderson Field
on Guadalacanal in damaged planes, better than bailing out and being
caught by the Japanese....
Post by Rob Arndt
James: Is there anything you would like to say to the young people
today?
Anna: Yes, flying is a great adventure, it is a joy that is boundless,
but try to do your flying when people are not trying to shoot you
down. Flying into Stalingrad was not fun, but we had to do it, we
could not let so many young men die. The future will be better for
everyone if we could be at peace and flying could be enjoyed for what
it is, the most fun that you can have!! The memories of flying the
Alps in a Junkers Ju-52/3m will be with me forever!!
I wonder if she ever got back up in one after the war? Surely some
pilot in a European airline might have let her have some stick time if
she was a passenger on one. Or some restoration group/person today who
had one.
Post by Rob Arndt
Rob
Rob Arndt
2010-05-09 06:29:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David E. Powell
Post by Rob Arndt
FLYING THE JUNKERS 52/3m at STALINGRAD
By Jim Newsom
The following is an interview with Anna Kresiling - The White Wolf of
the Luftwaffe- of what it was like to fly the Junkers Ju-52/3m
trimotor in World War II.
James: How many Lady pilots flew with the Luftwaffe in World War II?
Anna: At the beginning of the war there were 50 pilots that flew
transport aircraft, and there were many more who trained our young
fledgling pilots, but both Hitler and Goering were against women
flying fighters and bombers in combat. In Russia there were many women
that flew fighters and bombers for Stalin.
I'd also think that women working in war industries would have been a
key difference too.
Post by Rob Arndt
James: I have flown in the Ford Trimotor, The Junkers Ju-52/3m has
always been one of my favorite airplanes, what was it like to fly?
Anna: The Junkers was an amazing and beautiful aircraft to fly! At
Stalingrad sometimes I made take-offs with only two engines running.
If you had only one engine running you could maintain altitude.
Visability was wonderful, but the Junkers was a complex aircraft and
you needed a great instructor if you wanted to learn quickly how to
fly the trimotor.
It must be nice considering how many stayed in service even years
after the war in various airlines.
Post by Rob Arndt
James: You mentioned STALINGRAD, was that the nightmare we read so
much about in history books?
Anna: Stalingrad was a living hell, but what happened at Crete was far
worse. For our airborne assault on Crete we had over 450 Junkers Ju-52
trimotors filled with paratroopers. We were told that we would not
encounter ack ack flak, and taking the island would be easy. However,
the island was filled with Australian, New Zealand, and British troops
who fought like hell and we lost over half our planes and troops
taking that island. I was not there; I was lucky because I was based
at France at the time. We lost so many good pilots and men at Crete.
We would have won the war against Russia if we had saved those planes
and men.
Maybe supplied Stalingrad better but otherwise.... well she's entitled
to her opinion. Crete costing them more planes than Stalingrad is
where she is going, as far as loss of paratroops and airmobile assets,
plus transports and trained crews, it must have been a disaster for
the Gerries.
Post by Rob Arndt
James: Speaking of Russia, tell me about Stalingrad.
Anna: For many years I could not talk about it, it was too terrible.
Goering who had promised Hitler that he could re-supply Stalingrad
from the air had no idea what he was talking about. Von Pailis and the
6th Army should have been ordered to fight their way out. But Hitler
agreed to airlift when Paulus agreed to stay, that victory was near.
Then Hitler tole Paulus he had to stay when the opposite became clear.
Hitler's early gift for overriding generals at times like the
Czechoslovakia attack in 1938 bit him here, later in the war.
Post by Rob Arndt
The Junkers Ju-52/3m flew 95% of all the missions into Stalingrad.
Other planes also flew in this massive airlift, but the Junkers was
the workhorse. The nightmare was crashing into Stalingrad itself. If
you were captured by the Russians, they brutally tortured you before
they would kill you. At Stalingrad we had over 7,000 women working in
the German Army that Hitler wanted flown out because what the Russians
would do to them.
Much like US Female personell that were evacuated from the
Phillipines....
Post by Rob Arndt
At Stalingrad we had over 350,000 men fighting the communist hoardes,
but it was not enough. We Didn’t have enough fuel, fighters, trained
mechanics, and even decent runways to work with. I usually flew out of
Tatsinskaya with food and supplies loaded aboard. I also carried three
gunners, two in the waist position and one on top. At Stalingrad
Russian Yaks were everywhere and our losses were grim.
The Russian Yak was very similar to the British Spitfire, very
maneuverable and fast. If they came out of the sun and caught you by
surprise, it was all over. However, many Russian pilots made the
mistake of approaching slowly from behind and that is when my young
men would shoot them down.
Once I heard of a gunner who ran out of ammunition, and in desperation
threw toilet paper at the Russian Yak, and the Russian was frightened
away by it!! The Russians did not know what toilet paper was, so this
pilot probably thought the gunner was throwing a bomb at him. This
trick worked many times.
James: What were the casualties at Stalingrad?
Anna: We lost 800 Ju-52 trimotors at Stalingrad, so many great superb
pilots we lost. Germany never recovered from these losses. Hitler
should have resigned and the High Command surrender to the Americans
and British.
The separate peace idea was floated several times but rejected I
believe, though Hitler was the main problem. Him resigning would have
been huge but he probably figured he'd be dead if he did - so he put
himself over his country, an error for any national leader. By June
1944, after D-Day at Normandy, even Field Marshal von Rundstedt was
telling Hitler that it was over and he should make peace immediately.
(For which he was fired.)
 I only survived through luck and determination not to be
Post by Rob Arndt
captured by the Russians. It is easy to be brave with two engines on
fire when the alternative is to be captured by the Russians.
I hear that, similar to U.S. fliers who glided home to Henderson Field
on Guadalacanal in damaged planes, better than bailing out and being
caught by the Japanese....
Post by Rob Arndt
James: Is there anything you would like to say to the young people
today?
Anna: Yes, flying is a great adventure, it is a joy that is boundless,
but try to do your flying when people are not trying to shoot you
down. Flying into Stalingrad was not fun, but we had to do it, we
could not let so many young men die. The future will be better for
everyone if we could be at peace and flying could be enjoyed for what
it is, the most fun that you can have!! The memories of flying the
Alps in a Junkers Ju-52/3m will be with me forever!!
I wonder if she ever got back up in one after the war? Surely some
pilot in a European airline might have let her have some stick time if
she was a passenger on one. Or some restoration group/person today who
had one.
Post by Rob Arndt
Rob- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Anna was protected by the OSS/CIA and kept away from the Russians that
wanted to know if she had taken high-profile Nazis out of the Reich
and what her dealings were with the US and intelligence gathered on
the USSR. They also wanted to know about Kammler and the Bell Device
in connection with the Ju-390. Stalin knew that only 3 German pilots
were capable of taking Hitler out of Berlin in April 1945- Baur,
Reitsch, and Kreisling. Amazing- two women and only one man.

As for her flying- she continued after the war and was spotted at
sensitive US facilities. She owns a DC-3 which she has flown at Reno.
"A toy when compared to the Ju-390" she once told a neighbor. She and
her rich industrialist husband have met several US Presidents and
VIPs.

Not bad for someone that is generally unknown in aviation history
except for us who know more.

The "White Wolf of the Luftwaffe" who was the only real competitor to
Hanna Reitsch for 1945 rescue work and Hanna never flew the awesome
Ju-390. Neither did Baur.

Rob
Keith Willshaw
2010-05-09 10:20:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rob Arndt
FLYING THE JUNKERS 52/3m at STALINGRAD
By Jim Newsom
The following is an interview with Anna Kresiling - The White Wolf of
the Luftwaffe- of what it was like to fly the Junkers Ju-52/3m
trimotor in World War II.
Rob there is no evidence that this blonde bimbo ever flew in anything
other than a passenger aircraft. She has been pulling the wool over the
eyes of the gullible for years. You are supposed to be a researcher
I know you have asked for photographic evidence to support her claims.

There is none - it didn't happen - deal with it.

Keith
Gordon
2010-05-09 17:58:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On May 9, 3:20 am, "Keith Willshaw"
Post by Keith Willshaw
Post by Rob Arndt
FLYING THE JUNKERS 52/3m at STALINGRAD
By Jim Newsom
The following is an interview with Anna Kresiling - The White Wolf of
the Luftwaffe- of what it was like to fly the Junkers Ju-52/3m
trimotor in World War II.
Rob there is no evidence that this blonde bimbo ever flew in anything
other than a passenger aircraft. She has been pulling the wool over the
eyes of the gullible for years. You are supposed to be a researcher
I know you have asked for photographic evidence to support her claims.
There is none - it didn't happen - deal with it.
Keith
What I have noticed is that there doesn't seem to be any support for
her claims among German wartime pilots -- I don't see anyone lining up
to say, "I flew with her at Stalingrad." I have asked the three guys
I spend most time with (Ju 88 pilot, Do 217 nav, Me 262 nf pilot) --
all served throughout the war -- and none ever heard of a female Ju 52
pilot, or a "White Wolf" of any kind. If wartime German pilots have
no clue who she was, tell me precisely what we have, other than her
word? The dates for the flight don't work, the range of the aircraft
doesn't work, no one during the war every mentioned a peep on ULTRA
about it, hell, there is more evidence of If years from now I decided
that my two measely live rescues wasn't enough for me to feel good
about myself, I can understand old minds exaggerating, much as it
appears that Ms. Kreisling has done. Other than _her word_, what do
we have? Apply Occam's Razor and what we have is a good story,
without any documentation or additional witnesses. Its a good story
Rob, but there isn't anything to back it up.

Gordon
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